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Research Highlights

Warm ocean temperatures caused large-scale ecological disruption that affected different species, including lobster. (© AP Photo / Robert F. Bukaty as seen in Oceanus magazine Vol. 54, No. 2)

The Ocean’s Moveable Feast

Australia satellite image of bushfire

Investigating the ocean’s influence on Australia’s drought

dipole

Global heating supercharging Indian Ocean climate system

Climate Central sea level rise graphic

WHOI scientists weigh in on sea level rise impact study

Summer Resident

Chris Linder wins Photography Award for story on Adélie penguins

sea washing onto road

WHOI on NPR: Why sea level rise varies across the world

Blue shark

A tunnel to the Twilight Zone

Blue shark

A tunnel to the Twilight Zone

windfarm-cable

A new way of “seeing” offshore wind power cables

NASA image - hurricane Florence

WHOI prepares for 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Season

WHOI researchers Lizzy Soranna (front left), Lizzie Wallace (front right), and Nicole D'Entremont head out to conduct hurricane research in an azure-colored marine sinkhole—formally known as a blue hole—off Caicos Island in the Caribbean. They collected sediment samples from the bottom of the hole to learn more about the characteristics of Hurricane Irma, a Category 5 storm that passed over the area in early September of 2017. (Photo by Rose Palermo, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution).

Hurricane Clues from a Caribbean Blue Hole

Captains and first mates of whaling ships kept daily logs of weather information during each voyage, including wind speed and direction, sea conditions, air temperature, and other variables. Researchers can use these weather records to gain a better understanding of climate conditions we face today. (Photo by Justin Buchli)

Mining climate clues from our whaling past

Captains and first mates of whaling ships kept daily logs of weather information during each voyage, including wind speed and direction, sea conditions, air temperature, and other variables. Researchers can use these weather records to gain a better understanding of climate conditions we face today. (Photo by Justin Buchli)

Mining climate clues from our whaling past

(Photo by Ethan Daniels, Shutterstock)

Study Finds No Direct Link Between North Atlantic Ocean Currents, Sea Level Along New England Coast

windfarm-cable

A new way of “seeing” offshore wind power cables

Harnessing the Power

Harnessing the Power

Gliders Reveal Tango Between Hurricanes and the Gulf Stream

Gliders Reveal Tango Between Hurricanes and the Gulf Stream

Tracking a Snow Globe of Microplastics

Tracking a Snow Globe of Microplastics