WHOI in the News


A Tiny Camera Could Help Shellfish Farmers Avoid Big Losses

WCAI NPR
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Cape Cod’s shellfish farmers face many challenges, and one of the biggest is dealing with harmful algal blooms, which can damage shellfish and be poisonous for humans to ingest. But a new project at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is looking at a way to better manage this with the help of a tiny camera.

The ghosts of ancient hurricanes live in Caribbean blue holes

National Geographic

South Andros Island, part of the Bahamian archipelago, is a sandy slice of paradise whose shores conceal buried geological treasures: blue holes. Hiding in the depths of these ethereal submarine sinkholes lay ancient sediment sandwiches whose layers betray the bygone passages of powerful hurricanes.

Panel delves into impact of ocean acidification

Cape Cod Times

The state commission tasked with studying ocean acidification and its regional impact — particularly in relation to the aquaculture industry — held its first meeting Friday in Woods Hole with a sobering presentation on the phenomenon.

Autonomous Robotic Boats Improve Environmental Sampling at Sea

Sci Tech Daily

An autonomous robotic system invented by researchers at MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) efficiently sniffs out the most scientifically interesting — but hard-to-find — sampling spots in vast, unexplored waters.

More Than 11,000 International Scientists Declare Climate Emergency

WCAI

A new paper endorsed by 11,258 scientists and researchers from 153 countries describes climate change as a “climate emergency.” Published in the journal BioScience, it warns of “untold human suffering” if individuals, governments, and businesses don’t make deep and lasting changes.

How Cheap Robots Are Transforming Ocean Exploration

Outside Magazine

For researchers, affordable tech opens up new worlds. “Your decision process is fundamentally different when you can use cheaper tools,” says Jim Bellingham, director of the Center for Marine Robotics at WHOI.

Why are birds and seals starving in a Bering Sea full of fish?

Seattle Times

Federal and university scientists are trying to better understand why some birds and marine mammals have been unable to find enough food, and whether toxic algae blooms — increasing as the water warms — could have contributed or caused some of the die-offs.

How Interconnected Is Life in the Ocean?

The Scientist

To help create better conservation and management plans, researchers are measuring how marine organisms move between habitats and populations.

Admiral John Richardson Joins WHOI Board of Trustees

Cape Cod Today

John Richardson recently joined the WHOI Board of Trustees. Richardson, a four-star admiral in the United States Navy, retired from his position as the 31st Chief of Naval Operations in August of this year.

FEATURE – Maritime Autonomy

ADBR

REMUS AUVs were developed by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute with later models manufactured by a subsidiary of Norway’s KONGSBERG.