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WHOI in the News


Whale sharks are on the move, but why?

Science 101

Whale sharks are endangered, hard to track, and minimally protected, but thanks to a new tracking study and a lot more information, scientists have been able to monitor the movement of these gentle ocean giants.

March of the penguins

New Zealand Geographic

CLIMATE CHANGE COULD spell the end for emperor penguins by the year 2100—that’s the somber prediction of a new international study.

Climate change threatens everyone’s favorite little fish

Cape Cod Times

The well-being of the colorful clownfish of “Finding Nemo” fame is closely tied to its habitat among the sea anemone, according to a 10-year study by an international team of scientists. The little fish does not appear to have the ability to adapt to the rapid environmental effects of climate change.

 

A Tiny Camera Could Help Shellfish Farmers Avoid Big Losses

WCAI NPR
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Cape Cod’s shellfish farmers face many challenges, and one of the biggest is dealing with harmful algal blooms, which can damage shellfish and be poisonous for humans to ingest. But a new project at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is looking at a way to better manage this with the help of a tiny camera.

The ghosts of ancient hurricanes live in Caribbean blue holes

National Geographic

South Andros Island, part of the Bahamian archipelago, is a sandy slice of paradise whose shores conceal buried geological treasures: blue holes. Hiding in the depths of these ethereal submarine sinkholes lay ancient sediment sandwiches whose layers betray the bygone passages of powerful hurricanes.

Panel delves into impact of ocean acidification

Cape Cod Times

The state commission tasked with studying ocean acidification and its regional impact — particularly in relation to the aquaculture industry — held its first meeting Friday in Woods Hole with a sobering presentation on the phenomenon.

Autonomous Robotic Boats Improve Environmental Sampling at Sea

Sci Tech Daily

An autonomous robotic system invented by researchers at MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) efficiently sniffs out the most scientifically interesting — but hard-to-find — sampling spots in vast, unexplored waters.