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WHOI in the News


Move Over, Mars: The Search for Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon

Nautilus
nautilus logo

“The great thing about hydrothermal vents is that they provide a lot of energy sources for microbial life that doesn’t include sunlight,” says Julie Huber, a marine chemist at WHOI. Organisms living at hydrothermal vents on Earth’s seafloors, she explains, “can use chemical energy, so that means things like sulphur, iron, hydrogen and methane and they create a base of the food chain.”

Move Over, Mars: The Search for Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon

Nautilus

Alien microbes could be flourishing in the underground seas of Titan and the solar system’s other ocean worlds. “The great thing about hydrothermal vents is that they provide a lot of energy sources for microbial life that doesn’t include sunlight,” says Julie Huber, a marine chemist at WHOI.

Is seaweed the future of fuel?

Engineering & Technology Magazine

“Macroalgae needs to scale up to the point where it’s economically feasible for biofuel, and to do this we are going to have thousands of hectares of farms,” says Erin Fischell, an assistant scientist at WHOI.

Is seaweed the future of fuel?

Engineering & Technology Magazine

Erin Fischell, an assistant scientist at WHOI, points out: “Macroalgae needs to scale up to the point where it’s economically feasible for biofuel, and to do this we are going to have thousands of hectares of farms.”

Arctic Science Mission Wraps Up as Research Ship Docks in Germany

The New York Times
new york times

After a year spent drifting across the top of the world, frozen in sea ice, a German research ship returned home on Monday, ending the largest Arctic science expedition in history, one aimed at better understanding a region that is rapidly changing as the world warms.

WHOI-NOAA Partnership Tackles Critical Gap In Climate Knowledge

Markets Insider- Business Insider

Researchers at WHOI were awarded a $500,000 grant from the NOAA Climate Observations and Monitoring program to develop machine learning tools to improve estimates of air-sea heat exchange in the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas.

New Technology Can Save the Whales from Ship Collisions

LIVEKINDLY

In a bid to reduce the number of whale deaths, researchers Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and collaborators worked together to develop Whale Safe, a new detection system provides mariners with up to date information about whales present in shipping lanes.

Microplastics & The Textile Industry

Textile World Magazine

The study of marine microplastics is not new. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has been conducting research and publishing on this subject since the 1970s. Other organizations have been active as well.

Whale watching and learning

Santa Barbara News-Press

Whales aren’t the only large creature in the ocean; there’s also cargo ships. When the two collide, it’s fatal to whales and barely noticeable to large ships cruising through the Santa Barbara Channel.

‘The Blob’: Low-oxygen water killing lobsters, fish in Cape Cod Bay.

Cape Cod Times

While it was valuable data for the team of marine fisheries scientists, the Center for Coastal Studies and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution that were trying to solve the mystery of The Blob, it also told fishermen when oxygen levels were low and it was time to move to another spot.

Meet the new wash-ashore: Portuguese man-of-war

Cape Cod Times

“They most likely arrive here via the Gulf Stream and then get blown or drift on shore,” Larry Madin, a retired senior scientist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.