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Research Highlights

Oceanus Magazine

Maria Pachiadaki

Our eyes on the seafloor

February 29, 2024

A Q&A with WHOI marine microbiologist Maria Pachiadaki on sampling the deep ocean with Jason

Common Eider

Wintering Waterbirds

February 22, 2024

Winter doldrums? Take a local birding trip to encounter a diversity of seabirds this season

Puzzling over a mollusk mystery

November 21, 2023

What’s causing a contagious cancer to spread among clams?

iologists Heidi Sosik (left) and Joel Llopiz (right) examine shadowgraph images of plankton

AI in the Ocean Twilight Zone

May 31, 2023

Deep Learning techniques are revealing new secrets about the mesopelagic

right whale in NY Harbor

Keeping an ear out for whales

May 31, 2023

Scientists look to safeguard the mammals with robotic buoys in the New York Bight

News Releases

Fin Whale

New Research Reveals: The New York Bight Is an Important Year-Round Habitat for Endangered Fin Whales

February 15, 2024

Researchers aim to use their science to help inform best practices and strategies to better protect fin whales in waters off NY and NJ

Woods Hole, Mass. – The New York Bight is an important year-round habitat for endangered fin whales, […]

Scientists Discover Additional Healthy Deep-sea Coral Reefs and New Seamounts in the Galápagos

November 1, 2023

Stunning 800 meter-long coral reef discovered with Schmidt Ocean Institute’s underwater robot off Galápagos Islands

Puerto Ayora, Ecuador- Scientists examining underwater cliff ecosystems onboard research vessel Falkor(too) using the 4,500 meter robot, ROV SuBastian, have discovered two pristine coral reefs in […]

Florida coral reef

Innovative Techniques Provide New Means to Monitor Coral Reef Health

September 21, 2023

These new techniques, which look at microbes and dissolved metabolites of reefs, offer a new means to examine reef features and have broad conservation applications.

whoi dock aerial

CINAR Names Four New Fellows in Quantitative Fisheries and Ecosystems Science

April 5, 2023

The goal of the fellowship program is to engage early-career scientists in research that supports the training and education in the he assessment and management of living marine resources in the Northeast U.S.

WHOI helps lead groundbreaking study on the human and ocean health impacts of ocean plastics

March 21, 2023

For the first time, leading researchers from the fields of healthcare, ocean science, and social science have collaborated to quantify plastic’s considerable risks to all life on Earth. The Minderoo-Monaco Commission on Plastics and Human Health report, released today, presents a comprehensive analysis showing plastics as a hazard at every stage of their life cycle.

News & Insights

The Rise of Orpheus (Part 1)

October 2, 2019

WHOI’s new deep-sea autonomous underwater vehicle moves one step closer to exploring the hadal zone—the deepest region of the ocean—to search for new clues about the limits of life on Earth, and possibly beyond.

Michael Moore

After 33 years, Michael Moore is still free to be curious at WHOI

September 26, 2019

Michael Moore is a senior scientist and director of the Marine Mammal Center at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Summer Resident

Chris Linder wins Photography Award for story on Adélie penguins

September 25, 2019

Expedition Multimedia Specialist Chris Linder wins Nature’s Best Photography Magazine’s Conservation Story Award on Adélie penguins

grey seal in gillnet

Underwater cameras tackle tough questions for fishery

September 3, 2019

Scientists, in collaboration with commercial fishermen, are using underwater video cameras to document the behavior of seals and other animals in and around fishing nets just east of Cape Cod—an area that has seen steady growth in gray seal populations over the past few years. 

WHOI in the Christian Science Monitor: How the deep sea could unlock outer space

August 28, 2019

“When hydrothermal vents were discovered in 1977, it very much flipped biology on its end,” says Julie Huber, an oceanographer who studies life in and below the seafloor at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) on Cape Cod. “People knew that organisms could live off of chemical energy, but they didn’t imagine they could support animal ecosystems.”

Scientists like Dr. Huber have continued to study those chemical-munching microbes. And it turns out, she says, a diverse set of microbes can be really good at making a living where the sun doesn’t shine. They make use of the chemicals available to them, even at some of the harshest vents, known as black smokers.