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Student Research

Oceanus Magazine

Through the Looking-Glass of the Sea Surface

Through the Looking-Glass of the Sea Surface

February 23, 2016

Scientists are using new technology to make previously impossible measurements at the turbulent ocean surface—a crucial junction for energy exchange between the air above and the sea below.

Ice, Wind & Fury

Ice, Wind & Fury

November 10, 2015

Greenlanders are well away of piteraqs, the hazardous torrents of cold air that sweep down off the ice cap. But scientists are just beginning to unravel how and when piteraqs…

A Mooring in Iceberg Alley

A Mooring in Iceberg Alley

July 25, 2014

WHOI scientists knowingly put a mooring in a fjord filled with icebergs near the terminus of a Greeland glacier. But it was their only way to learn if changing ocean…

Detours on the Oceanic Highway

Detours on the Oceanic Highway

March 13, 2014

WHOI graduate student Isabela Le Bras is exploring newly discovered complexities of the Deep Western Boundary Current, a major artery in the global ocean circulation system that transports cold water…

The Synergy Project, Part II

The Synergy Project, Part II

February 22, 2013

Back in my high school, and maybe yours too, kids naturally separated into cliques—jocks, punks, preppies, hippies, and at the extremes of the mythical left- and right-hemisphere brain spectrum, nerds and the artsy types. The latter two never spoke to each other. The rest of us rarely talked to either of them. Too bad. We…

The Synergy Project

The Synergy Project

February 15, 2013

Back in my high school, and maybe yours too, kids naturally separated into cliques—jocks, punks, preppies, hippies, and at the extremes of the mythical left- and right-hemisphere brain spectrum, nerds and the artsy types. The latter two never spoke to each other. The rest of us rarely talked to either of them. Too bad. We…

The Great South Channel

The Great South Channel

February 14, 2012

When people are hungry, they go to a place where they know they can find their favorite food. Right whales do much the same thing. In the Great South Channel, a deep-water passage between Nantucket and Georges Bank, thick swarms of tiny marine organisms known as copepods appear every spring. Basking sharks, cod, haddock, and…

Powerful Currents in Deep-Sea Gorges

Powerful Currents in Deep-Sea Gorges

January 25, 2012

On my first major research cruise, the ship was hit by a hurricane. On the second, the weather was even worse. In one particularly nasty storm, I remember standing braced on the ship’s bridge late at night, watching bolts of lightning light up the world. Each one revealed waves taller than the ship extending to…

Between the Beach and the Deep Blue Sea

Between the Beach and the Deep Blue Sea

November 10, 2011

Capt. Ken Houtler laughed when I remarked that I didn’t know the sun rose this early as I boarded his ship last summer. Now climbing aboard again in January, I feel even more justified thinking we all should still be sleeping, because the winter sun doesn’t rise until the middle of our two-hour trip from…

Where the Food Is in the Sea, and Why

Where the Food Is in the Sea, and Why

February 1, 2011

When you’re on a boat 50 miles south of Cape Cod on a calm day, the water around you may look flat and relatively featureless. A few hundred feet below, however, a cliff-edge hovers over an abyss. That edge, running roughly parallel to the coastline, is called the shelf break. There, the shallow, gently sloping…