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Ocean Life


Northern Star Coral Study Could Help Protect Tropical Corals

Worldwide, coral reefs are in crisis. A new study in mSystems, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology, investigates antibiotic-induced disturbance of the coral (Astrangia poculata) and shows that antibiotic exposure significantly altered the composition of the coral’s mucus bacterial microbiome, but that all the treated corals recovered in two weeks in ambient seawater. The work is important because it suggests that stony Northern Star Coral may be able to recover its mucus microbiome following disturbance, it identifies specific microbes that may be important to assembly, and it demonstrates that algal symbionts may play a previously undocumented role in the microbial recovery and resilience to environmental change.

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East Pacific Rise

Captured by the researchers and crew of Atlantis from HOV Alvin with artist Mel O’Callaghan during the 2018 UNOLS cruise.

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Deep Sea Science: Deep Sea Reveals Insights On Human

TECHregister

Scientists have discovered bacteria from the deep sea with components that are unrecognizable by the human immune system and may hold important properties in the development of cancer treatments and vaccines, according to a collaborative study published in Science Immunology.

Fewer than 366 North Atlantic Right whales are left on earth

Futurity

“North Atlantic right whales face a serious risk of extinction, but there is hope if we can work together on solutions. Trauma reduction measures and applying new tools to assess their health are critically important to enhance the welfare of individual whales. If we can reduce the number of deaths, and successfully improve their health (and increase their) reproduction, the current decline in population can be reversed,” says lead study author Michael Moore, a whale trauma specialist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Study reveals energy sources supporting coral reef predators

phys.org

The scientists believe that this offshore energy may be entering the food web through lower-level plankton feeding fish that the groupers are then feeding on. This is likely to be supported by inputs of nutrient-rich deep water, which are little understood.