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Ocean Life


Why Science Labs Love Older Scientists

Next Avenue

Sallie Chisholm, a 72-year-old biologist, has been enthralled by a tiny aquatic microbe that she and a team from WHOI discovered in the Atlantic Ocean in 1985.

The Earth-Shaping Animal Migration No One Ever Sees

Nautilus
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“All the vehicles on the road in the United States produce around 1.5 PgC per year,” says Kevin Archibald, a biological oceanographer at WHOI and lead author of that study. DVM could be understood as offsetting about two-thirds of all U.S. automobile emissions.

Ropeless Fishing Systems Hold Promise for Fishermen—and Whales

The Pew Charitable Trusts

To help advance the effort to find a feasible and cost-effective gear-marking solution, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, The Pew Charitable Trusts and others are engaged in conversations with industry, enforcement, and regulators in the U.S. and Canada—which will culminate in a virtual workshop on gear marking in the coming months.

Move Over, Mars: The Search for Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon

Nautilus
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“The great thing about hydrothermal vents is that they provide a lot of energy sources for microbial life that doesn’t include sunlight,” says Julie Huber, a marine chemist at WHOI. Organisms living at hydrothermal vents on Earth’s seafloors, she explains, “can use chemical energy, so that means things like sulphur, iron, hydrogen and methane and they create a base of the food chain.”

Move Over, Mars: The Search for Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon

Nautilus

Alien microbes could be flourishing in the underground seas of Titan and the solar system’s other ocean worlds. “The great thing about hydrothermal vents is that they provide a lot of energy sources for microbial life that doesn’t include sunlight,” says Julie Huber, a marine chemist at WHOI.

New Technology Can Save the Whales from Ship Collisions

LIVEKINDLY

In a bid to reduce the number of whale deaths, researchers Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and collaborators worked together to develop Whale Safe, a new detection system provides mariners with up to date information about whales present in shipping lanes.

Whale watching and learning

Santa Barbara News-Press

Whales aren’t the only large creature in the ocean; there’s also cargo ships. When the two collide, it’s fatal to whales and barely noticeable to large ships cruising through the Santa Barbara Channel.

‘The Blob’: Low-oxygen water killing lobsters, fish in Cape Cod Bay.

Cape Cod Times

While it was valuable data for the team of marine fisheries scientists, the Center for Coastal Studies and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution that were trying to solve the mystery of The Blob, it also told fishermen when oxygen levels were low and it was time to move to another spot.

Meet the new wash-ashore: Portuguese man-of-war

Cape Cod Times

“They most likely arrive here via the Gulf Stream and then get blown or drift on shore,” Larry Madin, a retired senior scientist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Want to Save the Whales? Eavesdrop on Their Calls

Wired
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“Moorings are typically made from chain, so they clank a lot,” says Mark Baumgartner, whale ecologist and senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, who helped develop the technology. “And that’s not really good when you’re trying to hear animals that are many miles away making sounds.”