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Now you see me, now you don’t

sand lance

Marine biologists tackle an unsettling mystery surrounding sand lance–eel-like, dive-bombing fish that have become a cornerstone forage species for a wide range of marine animals in the Gulf of Maine and northwest Atlantic Ocean.

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Finding medical answers in the ocean

per

The test being used to diagnose the novel coronavirus—and other pandemics like AIDS and SARS—was developed with the help of an enzyme isolated from a microbe found in marine hydrothermal vents as well as freshwater hot springs.

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Opening our eyes to the deep: Molly Curran

Molly Curran is a mechanical engineer in WHOI’s Deep Submergence Laboratory. She works on the design and operation of deep-sea robotic systems, including remotely operated vehicles, autonomous vehicles, and deep-sea samplers. She was the institution’s first pilot for Mesobot, WHOI’s latest autonomous robot designed to study the midwater realm known as the ocean twilight zone.

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A sea of ancient ice

ancient ice

WHOI scientist dusts off historical accounts to tackle the long-standing mystery of just how thick Arctic sea ice was in the early 19th century.

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COVID-19 Guidelines

As news and information about the novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to develop, you may have questions on best practices, travel, and other concerns. To address many questions on travel, self-quarantine, and related issues, we developed FAQs for WHOI employees and students.

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Oceans of Change

Walking on polar ice

Oceans of Change WHOI scientists learn how the ocean shapes—and is shaped by—global climate By Madeline Drexler (Photo by Simon…

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Spock versus the volcano

brain

Five hundred meters below the calm surface waters of the Aegean Sea off Santorini Island, Greece, lies an active submarine volcano. There, a decision-making robot equipped with artificial intelligence searches for life and danger.

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Understanding the Melting Arctic

Glaciologist Sarah Das explains why surface melting and runoff across Greenland’s mile-thick ice sheet sped up dramatically in the 20th and 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating.

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Paul Caiger hunts for things that glow in the Ocean Twilight Zone

Paul Caiger is a fish biologist, marine photographer and postdoctoral investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). From the ghoulish grimace of the viperfish, to the bejeweled beauty of the strawberry squid, Caiger’s marine portraits have helped shine a light in this dark but critical ocean zone.

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The Ocean’s Moveable Feast

Warming waters are changing the marine food web. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Scientists Carin Ashjain and Glen Gawarkiewicz study those changes.

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90 Years of Ocean Research, Education, and Exploration

In the 90 years since its inception, Wood Hole Oceanographic Institution has grown from a summer laboratory to a year-round global research operation with more than 1,000 oceanographers, engineers, students, and support staff. Today, we celebrate nearly a century of marine science and discovery.

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Sea anemones with jet lag?

WHOI scientists investigate the internal body clocks of sea anemones to determine if fluctuating temperatures play a role in their daily rhythms.

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The oceans are losing oxygen, and faster than we thought

WHOI scientists weigh in on a new ICUN report highlighting a 2% decline in marine oxygen levels between 1960 and 2010. The loss of oxygen has triggered an expansion of marine dead zones throughout the global ocean that has put marine life and ecosystems in peril.

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The Ocean Twilight Zone’s crucial carbon pump

Ken Buesseler

When CO₂ enters the ocean, where does this heat-trapping gas go? WHOI geochemist investigates how much carbon from the surface ocean is dispatched to the ocean twilight zone–the midlayer of the ocean–and on to the deep ocean.

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Bioacoustic alarms are sounding on Cape Cod

The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and its Marine Mammal Rescue Team in Yarmouth, Mass. have responded to a record high of more than 464 marine mammals stranded on Cape Cod since January this year. Researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) believe patterns from animal sound data may be the key to curbing these numbers.

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