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Racing an undersea volcano

A 3D rendering of the East Pacific Rise

Using AUV Sentry to make a high-resolution, near-bottom, seafloor map before the next volcanic eruption at the East Pacific Rise

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Microbial Methane – New Fuel for Ocean Robots?

Methane seep

Researchers are developing on an energy harvesting platform that converts marine methane to electricity. The system could be an answer to power-hungry robots that are being asked to explore increasingly larger swaths of the ocean.

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The Search for Life

WHOI researchers featured in episode of news program Full Measure February 17, 2021 This week, NASA’s Perseverance Rover lands on…

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Could listening to the deep sea help save it?

A recent New York Times article about sound in the deep ocean briefly mentions the work by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) acoustic scientist Ying-Tsong “YT” Lin and his work developing an “acoustic telescope.”

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Mining ancient dust from the ocean’s loneliest spot

Researchers investigate dust from the ocean’s farthest point from land to reconstruct the climactic history of the Southern Hemisphere, and understand how micronutrients have influenced biological productivity in this oceanic desert.

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Uncharted waters

Uncharted Water

Our global ocean will change dramatically over the next few decades. What might it look like, and how will humans adapt?

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Uncharted Waters

Uncharted Water

Our global ocean will change dramatically over the next few decades. What might it look like, and how will humans adapt?

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The many lifetimes of plastics

plastics by the numbers

Infographics strive to give us a sense of how long plastic goods will last in the environment. But is this information reliable? The findings of a new study from WHOI may surprise you.

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Bottlenose dolphins continue to compensate for humans in spite of pandemic

Though vessel noise may be quieting down on the high seas, one coastal area in Florida is seeing an upswing in boat traffic according to local authorities, putting more pressure on the world’s longest-studied wild bottlenose dolphin community. A recent WHOI study suggests this is only the beginning of a larger trend.

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