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Evan Lubofsky


Evan Lubofsky is a science writer and editor at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 

After studying journalism at UMass Amherst, he began writing about sensor and instrumentation technologies, eventually working with ocean scientists to tell stories about coral reef ecology, estuarine studies, and other areas of research. He was a 2015 WHOI Ocean Science Journalism Fellow, and his work has appeared in Smithsonian, The Verge, Mental Floss, Hakai Magazine, and Frontiers in Ecology among other publications.

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Mining climate clues from our whaling past

Climate scientists work with historians to tap weather records from old New England whaling logbooks. They hope to leverage the historical data to gain new insights into modern-day climate conditions.

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King Kelp

Scott Lindell

To help fuel our future energy needs, researchers are sizing up thousands of blades of sugar kelp—a promising source of biofuels—to breed strains that grow larger, heartier, and more abundantly.

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Fish with Flashlights

Down in the dark and shadowy ocean twilight zone, countless species—bristlemouths, lanternfishes, jellies, and others—rely on bioluminescence for a variety of important functions, including finding their next meal, outsmarting predators, and looking for mates.

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Virgin Island Corals in Crisis

A coral disease outbreak that wiped out nearly 80% of stony corals between Florida’s Key Biscayne and Key West during the past two years appears to have spread to the U.S. Virgin Islands (U.S.V.I.), where reefs that were once vibrant and teeming with life are now left skeleton white in the disease’s wake.

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Seal Spy

Marine ecologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is exploring new, non-invasive approaches to measuring the body mass of gray seals. Photo by Michelle Shero

Drones helps WHOI scientist measure the body mass of mother and pup seals during lactation

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Particles on the Move

Particles on the Move

An MIT-WHOI Joint Program student investigates what happens to nanoplastics once they’re ingested by fish.

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A ‘Ticking Time Bomb’ in the Arctic

A 'Ticking Time Bomb' in the Arctic

Scientists discover that the amount of heat in a major Arctic Ocean circulation system has doubled over the past 30 years. If the temperatures continue to spike, it could eventually spell trouble for the ice above.

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Junk Food

Junk Food

An estimated eight million tons of plastics enter our oceans each year, yet only one percent can be seen floating…

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A Double Whammy for Corals

A Double Whammy for Corals

Scientists know that gradually rising ocean temperatures can push corals past a threshold and cause them to bleach. But combine…

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Back to Bikini

Back to Bikini

WHOI scientists returned to the Pacific islands of Bikini and Enewetak in 2015 to study radioactive contamination nearly 70 years after the U.S. used the islands for nuclear weapons testing. What they learned could also be applied to a more recent nuclear disaster: the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi reactor meltdown in Japan.

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