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Oceanus Articles


A Telescope to Peer into the Vast Ocean

A Telescope to Peer into the Vast Ocean

There are more single-celled plankton in the ocean than stars in the universe. A new instrument is about to depart on a mission across the vast Pacific to capture images of what is out there.

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One Algae, Two Fuels

New research shows a way to tap overlooked fats in marine algae to produce compounds used in jet fuel.

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New Use for Well-known Algae

New Use for Well-known Algae

A curious chemical compound in certain marine algae has been a godsend for oceanographers, helping them reconstruct past ocean conditions. Now the same compounds also may be useful in a completely different way: to produce jet fuel.

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Bringing a Lab to the Seafloor

Bringing a Lab to the Seafloor

Scientists can’t really know if new oceanographic instruments will really work until they try them in actual conditions in the real ocean. In this case, the rubber hit the road at the bottom of the sea.

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The Jetyak

The Jetyak

Oceanographers are always looking for cost-effective vehicles to help them explore risky regions. Scientists at WHOI have developed one: a robotic platform called the Jetyak.

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Farewell to the Knorr

Farewell to the Knorr

Over its 44-year career, the retiring research vessel Knorr was on the scene for many of the most significant discoveries in the ocean.

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Trouble in the Tropics

Trouble in the Tropics

An MIT-WHOI graduate student is on the trail of marine toxins that accumulate in fish and are eaten by people.

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From Lab to Sea

From Lab to Sea

Scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution share their field-tested experience, training graduate students on methods and instruments to collect data in the coastal ocean.

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Where Did Deepwater Horizon Oil Go?

Where Did Deepwater Horizon Oil Go?

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was unprecedented, and five years later, scientists are piecing together new insights into how the oil moved and behaved in the deep ocean.

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Coral-Current Connections

Coral-Current Connections

Will climate change shift a key ocean current in the Pacific? A graduate student is looking for clues recorded in coral skeletons.

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‘Covering’ Alvin‘s History

'Covering' Alvin's History

The Spellman Museum of Stamps and Postal History in Weston, Mass., is having an exhibit of postal covers and artifacts related to the submersible Alvin’s 50th anniversary Oct. 3 to Nov. 2.

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On the Trail of an Invader

On the Trail of an Invader

To find out when and how fast a small gray barnacle came to New England waters, WHOI researchers turn to forensic techniques.

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A Summer of Science by the Sea, 2014 (Part II)

A Summer of Science by the Sea, 2014 (Part II)

Every summer since 1959, undergraduates from around the world have come to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for a program to learn about ocean science and conduct research under the guidance of WHOI scientists. Read the second and final installment of our series of profiles of this year’s young scholars.

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It’s Hard to Kill a Killifish

It's Hard to Kill a Killifish

Summer Student Fellow Lily Helfrich is using a new molecular tool, microRNA analysis, to explore why some killifish are able to thrive in waters heavily contaminated with PCBs.

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A Summer of Science by the Sea, 2014 (Part I)

A Summer of Science by the Sea, 2014 (Part I)

Every summer since 1959, undergraduates from around the world have come to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for a program to learn about ocean science and conduct research under the guidance of WHOI scientists.

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Scallops Under Stress

Scallops Under Stress

Like other marine species, scallops face multiple climate change-related problems. Summer Student Fellow Cailan Sugano studied how scallops respond to acidification and lack of food—and whether extra food can help them resist damage due to more acidic seawater.

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Swimming in Low-pH Seas

Swimming in Low-pH Seas

Researchers knew that squid raised in acidified water developed abnormal balance organs. To find out whether the young squid could still balance and swim normally, Summer Student Fellow Doriane Weiler mapped their movements.

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