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Oceanus Articles


Lullaby for Larvae

Lullaby for Larvae

Like many babies, these tiny offspring arrived this spring amid much fanfare and a little trepidation. Never before had scientists…

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Swimming in the Rain

Swimming in the Rain

Twilight zones, witch hunts, and crossbows usually don’t find their way into tales about new oceanographic instruments. This story isn’t…

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Gone Fish Assessing

Gone Fish Assessing

Scientists at WHOI are applying new technologies to help the National Marine Fisheries Services assess fish stocks and maintain critical habitats

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Jason Versus the Volcano

Jason Versus the Volcano

Through the camera eyes of the undersea vehicle Jason, scientists were investigating a quietly bubbling pit on the side of…

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Scientists Gear Up to Launch Ocean Observing Networks

Scientists Gear Up to Launch Ocean Observing Networks

Oceanography is on the verge of a revolution. Scientists and engineers have been dreaming up networks of permanent observing outposts that could probe from the sea surface to the seafloor from many different locations in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic Oceans. And that dream may take a big step toward reality if Congress agrees to the National Science Foundation’s six-year Ocean Observatories Initiative.

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A Laser Light in the Ocean Depths

A Laser Light in the Ocean Depths

Graduate student Anna Michel is adapting laser technology to the murky fluid environment and crushing pressures at depths of 11,000 feet. The goal is to develop an instrument that can directly measure the many elements spewing from hydrothermal vents just as they emerge from Earth?s crust.

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Abandoned Walrus Calves Reported in the Arctic

Abandoned Walrus Calves Reported in the Arctic

Researchers on an oceanographic voyage in the Arctic Ocean report, for the first time, baby walruses unaccompanied by mothers in areas far from shore and over deep water, where they likely could not survive. The phenomenon was coincident with movement of warm water into Arctic basins and subsequent melting of the sea ice that walruses normally utilize as resting platforms.

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Do Fishing Regulations Lead to More Accidents?

Do Fishing Regulations Lead to More Accidents?

Fishermen have argued that regulations about when and where they can catch fish have caused more sinkings and fatal accidents at sea. But a new statistical analysis by Woods Hole researchers has found no hard evidence to support that argument.

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