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WHOI in the News


Why Science Labs Love Older Scientists

Next Avenue

Sallie Chisholm, a 72-year-old biologist, has been enthralled by a tiny aquatic microbe that she and a team from WHOI discovered in the Atlantic Ocean in 1985.

United States Contributions to Global Ocean Plastic Waste

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

MPC Research Specialist, Hauke Kite-Powell, has recently been appointed to a National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committee to study U.S. contributions to global ocean plastic waste.

How the waters off Catalina became a DDT dumping ground …

Los Angeles Times

A scientist involved in the discovery of the Titanic happened to be on board, so he helped them program the robots on where to go and how to search for the barrels. A marine geochemistry lab at WHOI ran the samples.

The Earth-Shaping Animal Migration No One Ever Sees

Nautilus
nautilus logo

“All the vehicles on the road in the United States produce around 1.5 PgC per year,” says Kevin Archibald, a biological oceanographer at WHOI and lead author of that study. DVM could be understood as offsetting about two-thirds of all U.S. automobile emissions.

Ropeless Fishing Systems Hold Promise for Fishermen—and Whales

The Pew Charitable Trusts

To help advance the effort to find a feasible and cost-effective gear-marking solution, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, The Pew Charitable Trusts and others are engaged in conversations with industry, enforcement, and regulators in the U.S. and Canada—which will culminate in a virtual workshop on gear marking in the coming months.

Move Over, Mars: The Search for Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon

Nautilus
nautilus logo

“The great thing about hydrothermal vents is that they provide a lot of energy sources for microbial life that doesn’t include sunlight,” says Julie Huber, a marine chemist at WHOI. Organisms living at hydrothermal vents on Earth’s seafloors, she explains, “can use chemical energy, so that means things like sulphur, iron, hydrogen and methane and they create a base of the food chain.”

Move Over, Mars: The Search for Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon

Nautilus

Alien microbes could be flourishing in the underground seas of Titan and the solar system’s other ocean worlds. “The great thing about hydrothermal vents is that they provide a lot of energy sources for microbial life that doesn’t include sunlight,” says Julie Huber, a marine chemist at WHOI.

Is seaweed the future of fuel?

Engineering & Technology Magazine

“Macroalgae needs to scale up to the point where it’s economically feasible for biofuel, and to do this we are going to have thousands of hectares of farms,” says Erin Fischell, an assistant scientist at WHOI.

Is seaweed the future of fuel?

Engineering & Technology Magazine

Erin Fischell, an assistant scientist at WHOI, points out: “Macroalgae needs to scale up to the point where it’s economically feasible for biofuel, and to do this we are going to have thousands of hectares of farms.”

The Lungs of the Earth: Shifting a Metaphor from Superstition to Science

Georgetown Journal of International Affairs
In a new article in the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, Aria Ritz Finkelstein and Oceanographer Emeritus Porter Hoagland address the discourse surrounding ocean deoxygenation. They argue that, while describing deoxygenation with sloppy policy metaphors can hinder effective marine governance, using well-constructed metaphors can help clarify ways that policymakers can effectively address the problem.

Arctic Science Mission Wraps Up as Research Ship Docks in Germany

The New York Times
new york times

After a year spent drifting across the top of the world, frozen in sea ice, a German research ship returned home on Monday, ending the largest Arctic science expedition in history, one aimed at better understanding a region that is rapidly changing as the world warms.

WHOI-NOAA Partnership Tackles Critical Gap In Climate Knowledge

Markets Insider- Business Insider

Researchers at WHOI were awarded a $500,000 grant from the NOAA Climate Observations and Monitoring program to develop machine learning tools to improve estimates of air-sea heat exchange in the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas.