News Releases


WHOI Announces 2017 Ocean Science Journalism Fellows

WHOI Announces 2017 Ocean Science Journalism Fellows

Eight writers, radio, and multimedia science journalists from the U.S., Canada, England, and India have been selected to participate in the competitive Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Ocean Science Journalism Fellowship program. The program takes place September 10-15, 2017, in Woods Hole, Mass., on Cape Cod.

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New Robot Speeds Sampling of Ocean’s Biogeochemistry and Health

New Robot Speeds Sampling of Ocean's Biogeochemistry and Health

The world’s first underwater vehicle designed specifically to collect both biological and chemical samples from the ocean water column successfully completed sea trials off the coast of New England on July 9, 2017. The new autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), named Clio, will help scientists better understand the inner workings of the ocean.

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Re-envisioning Underwater Imaging

Re-envisioning Underwater Imaging

The Advanced Imaging and Visualization Laboratory (AIVL) at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) working with Marine Imaging Technologies has developed a revolutionary new multi-function, underwater imaging system capable of generating ultra-high definition television (UHDTV) video, 2-D mosaic imaging, and 3-D optical models of seafloor objects and environments. The new state-of-the-art technology is currently being field-tested on several submerged shipwreck sites in both the U.S. and Europe.

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Finding New Homes Won’t Help Emperor Penguins Cope with Climate Change

Finding New Homes Won't Help Emperor Penguins Cope with Climate Change

Unlike other species that migrate successfully to escape the wrath of climate change, a new study shows that dispersal may help sustain global Emperor penguin populations for a limited time, but, as sea ice conditions continue to deteriorate, the 54 colonies that exist today will face devastating declines by the end of this century.

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WHOI Research Engineer Selected for NASA Astronaut Program

Loral O'Hara

Research Engineer Loral O’Hara was introduced today at Johnson Space Flight Center as a member of NASA’s most recent class of astronauts. O’Hara was one of just 12 to be selected from an applicant pool of more than 18,300 — the largest number NASA has ever received.

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More Frequent Extreme Ocean Warming Could Further Endanger Albatross

More Frequent Extreme Ocean Warming Could Further Endanger Albatross

As scientists grapple with the behavioral, ecological and evolutionary impacts of extreme climatic events, the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B created a special June issue to explore what is known on the topic and pioneer new approaches to this challenging and rapidly expanding field of study. The issue, which was published online May 8, 2017, was co-edited by Wood Hole Oceanographic institution (WHOI) biologist Stephanie Jenouvrier.

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Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Honored by Associated Industries of Massachusetts

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Honored by  Associated Industries of Massachusetts

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has ‘œtransformed Massachusetts’ by carving out a preeminent place in the field of ocean sciences, according to the Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM). A global leader in ocean science and a key driver of the economy on Cape Cod, WHOI will be presented with the Vision Award, AIM’™s highest honor, at a ceremony in Boston on May 5.

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Tracing the Puzzling Origins of Clinging Jellyfish

Tracing the Puzzling Origins of Clinging Jellyfish

For such small and delicate creatures, they can pack mighty painful stings. Known as clinging jellyfish because they attach themselves to seagrasses and seaweeds, Gonionemus is found along coastlines in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, and in particular in waters near Vladivostok, Russia. Exactly how these jellyfish, long assumed to be native to the North Pacific, became so widely distributed throughout the world has perplexed researchers for decades

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Don Anderson Selected for Prestigious Ketchum Award for Coastal Research

Don Anderson

Senior Scientist Don Anderson will receive WHOI’s prestigious 2017 Bostwick H. Ketchum Award, which honors an internationally recognized scientist who demonstrates an innovative approach to coastal research, leadership in the scientific community, and who forges a link between coastal research and societal issues.

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Taking Earth’s Inner Temperature

Taking Earth’s Inner Temperature

A new WHOI study led by WHOI suggests the mantle—the mostly solid, rocky part of Earth’s interior that lies between its super-heated core and its outer crustal layer—may be hotter than previously believed. The surprising finding could change how scientists think about many issues in Earth science including how ocean basins form.

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Panel to Discuss Deep-Sea Mining at AAAS Meeting

Panel to Discuss Deep-Sea Mining at AAAS Meeting

Home to an immense diversity of marine life, the deep ocean also contains valuable minerals with metals such as nickel, copper, cobalt, manganese, zinc, and gold, and rare-earth elements used in electronic technology like smart phones and medical imaging machines. As demand for these resources increases and supplies on land decrease, commercial mining operators are looking to the deep ocean as the next frontier for mining.

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