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Media Tip Sheet – September 2021

Welcome to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s media tip sheet.  You are receiving this email because you’ve asked to be kept up to date on news items, or we have worked with you in news reporting capacity.  If you don’t want to receive these monthly news tips, please respond to this email with the words “opt…

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FAQs: Radiation from Fukushima

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake—one of the largest ever recorded—occurred 80 miles off the coast of Japan. The earthquake created a series of tsunamis, the largest estimated to be over 100 feet, that swept ashore. In addition to the tragic toll of dead, injured, and displaced people, the earthquake and tsunamis badly…

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FAQs: Deep-Sea Mining

What is deep-sea mining? Deep-sea mining is the proposed extraction of metallic and non-metallic mineral resources from the ocean floor at water depths greater than 200 meters (650 feet). Shallow-water mining for sand, tin, and diamonds already occurs in some locations around the globe.

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FAQs: Clinging jellyfish

What are clinging jellyfish? Clinging jellyfish (Gonionemus) are small jellies—adults are about 2.5 centimeters (~1 inch) in diameter—that have an orange-brown cross on their transparent bodies. They are known as “clinging” jellyfish because they have sticky pads on their tentacles that allow them to anchor to seagrasses and seaweeds.

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Statement and FAQs on Cyberattack

On Tues., Oct. 13, 2015, the WHOI computer network was shut down for several hours and all WHOI email account holders were required to change their passwords. These actions were necessary because of an aggressive cyberattack on our system.

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Decompression sickness (the bends) in sea turtles: A new conservation threat

An international research team led by Daniel García (Director of Veterinary Services), Oceanográfic, Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias in Spain reports in the scientific journal Diseases of Aquatic Organisms that decompression sickness (DCS), also known as the bends, has been diagnosed for the first time in a live air-breathing, marine vertebrate—the loggerhead sea…

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More Methane from the Deep Sea: Mud volcanos as methane source

The mud volcano Haakon Mosby in the Barents Sea near Norway annually emits several hundred tons of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. But do mud volcanoes like Haakon Mosby emit gas and mud continuously or do their emissions come from episodic eruptions? A study by a research team, coordinated by the Max-Planck-Institute in Bremen, reports…

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Beaufort Gyre Exploration Update

October 2014—A concerted 12-year study of a remote interior region of the Arctic Ocean—considered the flywheel of Arctic climate—has revealed significant environmental changes that could in turn cause further changes in ocean circulation and climate.

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FAQ: Nereus

Hybrid remotely operated vehicle (HROV) Nereus was confirmed lost 9,990 meters (6.2 miles) below the sea surface in the Kermadec Trench northeast of New Zealand on May 10, 2014, at about 2:45 p.m. local time (10:45 p.m. Friday EDT).

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Crowdsourcing Fukushima Update

Coastal communities from Alaska to southern California have joined Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) marine chemist Ken Buesseler to monitor marine radioactivity levels. More than three years after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, questions remain about how much radioactive material has been released and how widely and quickly it is dispersing…

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Beaufort Gyre sea ice thins in recent decades, impacts climate

The accumulation and melting of sea ice in the Arctic has an enormous impact on the local climate, which in turn can affect the global climate. As the climate warms and Arctic sea ice retreats, it has become crucial to understand the complex ice-atmosphere-ocean dynamics within the Arctic. One major component in this dynamic is…

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WHOI Contributes to National Climate Assessment Report 3

More than 300 scientists contributed to the latest report on the current and future impacts of climate change on the United States. After an extensive review by experts from federal agencies and the National Academy of Sciences, the National Climate Assessment (NCA) Report 3 was approved and released for the public on May 6, 2014.

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FAQ: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has offered its expertise to the authorities responsible for the search for MH370. At this time, WHOI is not involved in the search. Until more information is available, we are limiting media interviews to those already booked.

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FAQ: Latest Scientific Findings on Climate Change

AR5 Working Group I Final Report Climate 2013: The Physical Science Basis   What is the IPCC? The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is an international body responsible for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)…

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FAQ: Radiation from Fukushima

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake—one of the largest ever recorded—occurred 80 miles off the coast of Japan. The earthquake created a series of tsunamis, the largest estimated to be over 100 feet, that swept ashore. In addition to the tragic toll of dead, injured, and displaced people, the earthquake and tsunamis badly…

Read More