Skip to content
For WHOI personnel, vendors, and visitors: COVID-19 Guidelines

News Releases


Our Moving Shoreline and Changing Climate

Sea level rise, eroding coastlines and increasing economic impact from severe storms on coastal communities are all part of studies underway at the Institution’s Coastal Ocean Institute. Climate researchers note that 2004 has been an unusually active hurricane season in the Atlantic, in part due to unusually warm tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures that are…

Read More

Deeper-Diving Human Occupied Submersible to Replace Alvin

Arlington, VA –After 40 years of scientific research that led to the discovery of new life forms, helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics, and enthralled schoolchildren around the world with seafloor images and video, the research submersible Alvin will be replaced by a new, deeper-diving vehicle. The National Science Foundation (NSF) will provide funding…

Read More

Where Currents Collide and Marine Mammals Gather

Cape Hatteras, where the Gulf Stream veers off the continental slope into the deep ocean and heads toward Europe, will be the site of two intensive surveys in August 2004 and January-February 2005 to study frontal structures and the related distribution of marine mammals. During winter months, a strong surface thermal front forms which may…

Read More

Insights into Harmful Algal Blooms

WHOI scientists have been sampling a coastal pond as part of a study of the effects of nutrients on toxic micro-algae that frequently contaminate shellfish in the pond and nearby marsh system with potent neurotoxins. The methods and approaches used in Salt Pond in Eastham, MA, can be applied to other HAB species and HAB…

Read More

A New Seafloor Observatory System

Monitoring earthquakes and changing ocean conditions, and adapting experiments to those changes, will now be possible with a new type of acoustically-linked moored observatory developed by WHOI scientists and engineers with colleagues at the University of Washington. The new observatory allows, for the first time, two-way communication between instruments on the seafloor or in the…

Read More

WHOI Elects Members and Trustees at Spring Meeting of the Corporation

Nine new members and two new trustees were elected at the recent Joint Meeting of the Board of Trustees and Corporation at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. All Members will serve until 2007. Members are elected initially for a term of three years and are eligible for reelection to six-year terms. Trustees serve four-year terms…

Read More

Abrupt Climate Change Brought to Public Attention in Hollywood Movie

The movie The Day After Tomorrow, released today by 20th Century Fox, paints a dramatic picture of the effects of climate change – and raises questions about the boundary between science and science fiction. How fast can Earth’s climate change? Will global warming raise sea level and flood coastal cities? If our climate cools, will…

Read More

New Chair of the Corporation Elected at WHOI

Thomas B. Wheeler, former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company, has been elected Chairman of the Corporation of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

Read More

Our Moving Shoreline

Scientists in the Coastal Ocean Institute (COI) are studying coastal erosion, storm impacts, development, nutrient inputs from septic systems and agriculture, and other phenomenon that impact our shoreline. A recent study of the Massachusetts coast, for example, found that an average of two feet per year is being lost to erosion, much more in some…

Read More

Oceanus Magazine Available Online

Oceanus, the oceanography magazine produced by WHOI, now has an online version at https://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/. Initial articles feature deep ocean exploration, such as the evolutionary puzzle of seafloor life, life beneath the sea floor, and undersea earthquakes. Articles on current research in the coastal ocean, including the debate over wind farms, are being added regularly, and…

Read More

Technology Opens World of Marine Archaeology off Greece

Scientists and engineers in the Deep Submergence Laboratory are working with Canadian, American and Greek colleagues to find and study the lost fleets of the Persian Wars. The WHOI team, experienced in underwater search and survey work and in imaging the seafloor in detail, has participated in a number of archaeological studies in the Mediterranean…

Read More

New Center for Oceans and Human Health Established in Woods Hole

Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have joined together to form the Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health (COHH). The new Center, with administrative offices at WHOI, will serve as a focal point for research on issues at the intersection…

Read More

WHOI Launches Coastal Vessel Tioga

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s new 60-foot coastal research vessel (CRV) Tioga was christened and launched March 29, 2004 in ceremonies at Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Duclos Corporation in Somerset, MA.

Read More

WHOI Receives $500,000 Gift from the Green Foundation

Philanthropist and Texas Instruments co-founder Cecil H. Green took special pleasure in giving away more than $200 million during his 102 years, a portion of it to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). His generosity to WHOI continues after his death with the announcement of a $500,000 gift from The Cecil and Ida Green Foundation.

Read More

VERTIGO: Carbon Cycling in the Twilight Zone

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists and their international colleagues will be at sea off Hawaii in June trying to learn more about the ocean’s ability to store atmospheric carbon dioxide. Its all part of a new two-year program called VERTIGO, VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean, to study the flux of sinking particles, which…

Read More

Ocean Observatories: A Presence in the Ocean 24/7

The growing number of ocean observatories in both coastal and deep waters around the country are providing scientists with a presence in the ocean 24 hours a day seven days a week. WHOI has built and deployed a number of the existing observatories, including the Long-term Ecosystems Observatory (LEO) off the New Jersey coast, the…

Read More