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News Releases


Research Project hopes to answer Global Climate Questions

CONTACTS: Karinna Sjo-Gaber Joint Oceanographic Institutions 202-232-3900 Joanne Tromp WHOI Media Relations 508-289-3340 The impacts of natural climate variability and the threat of anthropogenic climate change are issues that are increasingly being brought to public attention.  There is growing interest among the science community to forecast not just the local weather, but also the global…

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Should We Pump Iron to Slow Climate Change?

One of the solutions offered for the global greenhouse gas problem is the fertilization of the ocean; that is, spreading iron into the open ocean to promote the growth of floating microscopic plants. In at least 12 experiments over the past 14 years, researchers have shown that the presence of dissolved iron is critical to…

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Seafloor bacteria are multi-tasking with the carbon cycle

Scientists have long known that microorganisms can use one of two different methods to convert carbon dioxide into a form that living things can use for energy. What they didn’t know until recently is that at least one form of bacteria can switch between these two “carbon fixation” pathways or use them both at the…

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Climate Change in the Bottom of a Lake

Climate is often discussed in global terms, but it is the regional and local effects that will matter most to everyday people. WHOI geologist Jeff Donnelly and colleagues are looking closely at the regional effects of a past period of climate change, and it’s not all about rising temperatures. Between 5,400 and 3,000 years ago,…

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Is U.S. Marine Aquaculture Economically Sustainable?

With growing global populations and ever-increasing demands for seafood, fish farms are expected to expand significantly over the next few decades. But is aquaculture economically sustainable? Do the benefits outweigh the costs when all of the relevant environmental factors are considered? A team of social scientists from WHOI’s Marine Policy Center produced an analysis of…

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Going Virtual in Marine Biology Education

Whyvillians have a problem: harmful algae are threatening their beaches and coastal ecosystem. In order to investigate, understand, and mitigate the problem, citizens are turning to the Whyville Oceanographic Institution (WhOI), with its boats, its underwater laboratories, and other resources for exploring the ocean. This interactive experience is part of a new partnership between the…

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Jim Ledwell Awarded Agassiz Medal by National Academy of Sciences

Jim Ledwell

Oceanographer Jim Ledwell of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has been selected as the winner of the 2007 Alexander Agassiz Medal, awarded by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Ledwell, a senior scientist in the Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, specializes in the use of chemical tracers to observe currents in…

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The Third Elisabeth and Henry Morss Jr. Colloquium

Media Advisory WHAT: Fire and Ice—Climate Changes of the Past…and Future? A public debate on the lessons from a previous warm interval in Earth’s climate history The Third Elisabeth and Henry Morss Jr. Colloquium WHEN: Tuesday, January 30, 2007—4:30 to 6:30 p.m. WHERE: Redfield Auditorium Corner of School and Water Streets, Woods Hole, Massachusetts WHY:…

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Independent Panel Recommends Strong, Clear Guidelines for Development of Marine Aquaculture in the United States

Independent Panel Recommends Strong, Clear Guidelines for Development of Marine Aquaculture in the United States

Congress should enact legislation to ensure that strong environmental standards are in place to regulate the siting and conduct of offshore marine aquaculture, according to an independent panel of leaders from scientific, policymaking, business, and conservation institutions. Organized by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Marine Aquaculture Task Force was charged with examining…

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Eyes on the Ocean March 2007: A Photo Resource for the Media

  Eggs for Breakfast This egg sac of Euchaeta norvegica, a copepod, turned up in researchers’ plankton nets as they were being towed by the Albatross IV through the waters around Cape Cod. Researchers have been studying the many strands of the ocean food web to see what makes the southern New England area such…

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Scientists “See” New Ocean Floor Just Before and After It Is Created

A multidisciplinary research team from six institutions has for the first time successfully anticipated and then chronicled a seafloor eruption along the global mid-ocean ridge, the most active volcanic system on Earth. The event along the East Pacific Rise has provided researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) with a rare opportunity to observe what…

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WHOI Expands Research in Tropical Regions with New Initiative

With more than 25 percent of the planet lying between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) are taking advantage of a recent gift to expand studies from Panama to Palau and elsewhere around the world. A $600,000 gift from Rod and Liz Berens of New York will enable…

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WHOI Receives $1 Million Gift to Encourage Innovation in Technology

A longtime Osterville resident who loved the oceans and supported the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for more than four decades before he died in 2005 has left a $1 million gift to the Institution. The funds will be used for years to come as a named commitment honoring Townsend Hornor in the Institution’s Access to…

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Four WHOI Researchers Recognized for Contributions to Science and Engineering

Four researchers have been recognized by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) for their contributions to ocean sciences research and engineering. All will receive funding provided by the endowed awards to support their research over periods of three to five years. The awards are effective January 1, 2007. Three of the researchers have been named…

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Colossal Corer

A 50-meter (165-foot) long coring system nearing completion at WHOI will enable paleoceanographers to reconstruct past climates back tens of millions of years and expand the coring capabilities of the U.S. academic research fleet.  The Institution’s 279-foot research vessel Knorr, one of the largest ships in the fleet, has been modified to accommodate the new…

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Picture Perfect Plankton

The Large Area Plankton Imaging System, or LAPIS, is providing biologists with a new tool to study plankton to depths of 500 meters (1,640 feet). Until now, fragile gelatinous animals have been damaged or destroyed by nets, which animals can detect and avoid, and distributions over large areas are integreated, so scientists can not accurately…

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Mercury and Fish

WHOI scientists and colleagues at the University of Connecticut have found the first connection between mercury levels in freshwater fish and atmospheric mercury pollution, most of which is derived from fossil fuel combustion.  By comparing results from large databases for both mercury concentrations in largemouth bass, a widely distributed freshwater fish species, and atmospheric mercury…

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Beaked Whales Perform Extreme Dives to Hunt Deepwater Prey

A study of ten beaked whales of two poorly understood species shows they dive much deeper and longer than reported for any other air-breathing species, a finding of particular interest since beaked whales stranded during naval sonar exercises have been reported to have symptoms of decompression sickness.

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Lessons from the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami Topic of Public Forum

How coastal communities manage risks associated with major tsunamis is an issue of global importance following the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami that killed an estimated 200,000 people and caused billions of dollars in damage in 11 nations. The issue also has important implications for the general public on Cape Cod and in coastal communities…

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