Skip to content
For WHOI personnel, vendors, and visitors: COVID-19 Guidelines

News Releases


Scientists Use Marine Robots to Detect Endangered Whales

Two robots equipped with instruments designed to “listen” for the calls of baleen whales detected nine endangered North Atlantic right whales in the Gulf of Maine last month. The robots reported the detections to shore-based researchers within hours of hearing the whales (i.e., in real time), demonstrating a new and powerful tool for managing interactions…

Read More

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Establishes New Center for Marine Robotics

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) announces a new Center for Marine Robotics. The Center brings together academic, national security, and industrial partners with the goal of applying the full potential of computation and intelligence to bear to the ocean. “WHOI envisions the Center as the place where the future of robotic technology and capability…

Read More

WHOI Research Projects Awarded $5.2 M to Support Marine Microbial Research

There are more microbes in a bucket of seawater than there are people on Earth. Despite their abundance, humans are only just beginning to fathom the complex role marine microbes play in the ocean ecosystem. These tiny creatures are responsible for the chemical reactions that drive Earth’s marine biogeochemical cycles, yet, in terms of how…

Read More

Study Looks at Gray Seal Impact on Beach Water Quality

Scientists from the newly created Northwest Atlantic Seal Research Consortium (NASRC) are using data collected by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) to investigate whether seals may impact beach water quality along Outer Cape Cod. A growing population of gray seals has been cited as the reason for beach closures due to poor water…

Read More

WHOI Biologist Ketten Named AAAS 2012 Fellow

Ketten

Darlene Ketten of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. A marine biologist and neuro-anatomist specializing in functional analyses and biomedical imaging of sensory systems, Ketten was…

Read More

WHOI Engineers Develop and Test New Underwater High-Speed Wireless Communication System

Engineers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have developed a new wireless underwater communication system to control remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in real time. This new method may eliminate the need for long tether cables, offering a new degree of freedom in underwater robotics. The system, recently deployed on the WHOI battery-powered Nereus vehicle,…

Read More

New Research Consortium Brings Scientists, Fishermen, and Managers Together to Address Seal Issues in the Northeast

People come from miles away to see the seals off the shores of Cape Cod and surrounding regions, but the animals are creating some challenges for local fishermen. Recent increases in local seal abundance have led to concerns about fisheries interactions. The urgency of documenting, understanding, and mitigating these interactions has become more apparent. These…

Read More

Fishing for Answers off Fukushima

Japan’s “triple disaster,” as it has become known, began on March 11, 2011, and remains unprecedented in its scope and complexity. To understand the lingering effects and potential public health implications of that chain of events, scientists are turning to a diverse and widespread sentinel in the world’s ocean: fish. Events on March 11 began…

Read More

Genetic Patterns of Deep-Sea Coral Provide Insights into Evolution of Marine Life

The ability of deep-sea corals to harbor a broad array of marine life, including commercially important fish species, make these habitat-forming organisms of immediate interest to conservationists, managers, and scientists. Understanding and protecting corals requires knowledge of the historical processes that have shaped their biodiversity and biogeography. While little is known about these processes, new…

Read More

Researchers Highlight Growing Problem of Ocean Acidification

An international group of scientists, including researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, are working to improve communication about ocean acidification to help the public better understand the pressing global issue. The term “ocean acidification” (OA) describes the changes that occur in the ocean as a result of increased emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) into…

Read More

Newest Navy Research Vessel Is Named Neil Armstrong

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced the nation’s newest research vessel will be named the R/V Neil Armstrong, after the renowned astronaut and the first man to set foot on the moon. The ship will be operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

Read More

Dedication Ceremony Held for New Laboratory

WHOI President and Director Susan Avery and Director of Research Larry Madin were joined by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Deputy Director Willie May at a dedication ceremony Sept. 20 for the new Laboratory for Ocean Sensors and Observing Systems. The ceremonial ribbon cutting took place by the state-of-the-art facility’s high bay entrance,…

Read More

New Website Invites Public to Help Identify Seafloor Life and Habitats

A new partnership between oceanographers studying seafloor habitats, Web programmers and social scientists has resulted in a unique, interactive website called “Seafloor Explorer,” which asks members of the public to help identify objects they see in images of the seafloor. Seafloor Explorer (www.seafloorexplorer.org) launches September 13. The team has more than 40 millions images, but…

Read More

Human Impact Felt on Black Sea Long Before Industrial Era

When WHOI geologist Liviu Giosan first reconstructed the history of how the Danube River built its delta, he was presented with a puzzle. In the delta’s early stages of development, the river deposited its sediment within a protected bay. As the delta expanded onto the Black Sea shelf in the late Holocene and was exposed…

Read More

Tracking Fish Through a Coral Reef Seascape

Ocean scientists have long known that juvenile coral reef fishes use coastal seagrass and mangrove habitats as nurseries, later moving as adults onto coral reefs. But the fishes’ movements, and the connections between different tropical habitats, are much more complex than previously realized, according to a study published September 3 in Proceedings of the National Academy…

Read More

WHOI Hosts Public Talk – Titanic in 3D: An Archaeological Exploration

Titanic is an iconic shipwreck that has fascinated the public for a century.  But it also has a scientific and technological story to tell. On Saturday, Sept. 8, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution will host a public event entitled “Titanic in 3D: An Archaeological Exploration.” The free presentations will be held at 11 a.m., 1:30…

Read More

WHOI Scientist Contributes to Nature Study on Ocean Health

WHOI Senior Scientist Scott Doney is one of several contributors to a new comprehensive index designed to assess the benefits to people of healthy oceans worldwide. The Index – being called the Ocean Health Index – is the first broad, quantitative assessment of the critical relationships between the ocean and people, framed in terms of…

Read More

WHOI to Host Public Event on Ocean Acidification

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will host a public forum on ocean acidification and its effects on ocean life.  Ocean acidification is a global problem that results from the increase of carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere primarily from burning fossil fuels. Excess CO2 in the air dissolves in seawater and is converted…

Read More

WHOI Scientists and Engineers Partner with World-Renowned Companies to Market Revolutionary New Instruments

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers have partnered with two companies to build and market undersea technology developed at WHOI: the Imaging FlowCytobot, an automated underwater microscope, and BlueComm, an underwater communications system that uses light to provide wireless transmission of data, including video imagery, in real or near-real time.

Read More