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News Releases


Our Moving Shoreline

Scientists in the Coastal Ocean Institute (COI) are studying coastal erosion, storm impacts, development, nutrient inputs from septic systems and agriculture, and other phenomenon that impact our shoreline. A recent study of the Massachusetts coast, for example, found that an average of two feet per year is being lost to erosion, much more in some…

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Oceanus Magazine Available Online

Oceanus, the oceanography magazine produced by WHOI, now has an online version at https://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/. Initial articles feature deep ocean exploration, such as the evolutionary puzzle of seafloor life, life beneath the sea floor, and undersea earthquakes. Articles on current research in the coastal ocean, including the debate over wind farms, are being added regularly, and…

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New Center for Oceans and Human Health Established in Woods Hole

Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have joined together to form the Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health (COHH). The new Center, with administrative offices at WHOI, will serve as a focal point for research on issues at the intersection…

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WHOI Launches Coastal Vessel Tioga

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s new 60-foot coastal research vessel (CRV) Tioga was christened and launched March 29, 2004 in ceremonies at Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Duclos Corporation in Somerset, MA.

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WHOI Receives $500,000 Gift from the Green Foundation

Philanthropist and Texas Instruments co-founder Cecil H. Green took special pleasure in giving away more than $200 million during his 102 years, a portion of it to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). His generosity to WHOI continues after his death with the announcement of a $500,000 gift from The Cecil and Ida Green Foundation.

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For ALVIN its 40 and 4,000 in 2004!

ALVIN, the nation’s only deep-diving human occupied submersible, will mark a number of milestones in 2004. In April, the sub, currently at work in the eastern Pacific, is expected to make Dive #4,000. In early June, the sub will celebrate its 40th anniversary serving the US ocean research community. Operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic…

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Ocean Observatories: A Presence in the Ocean 24/7

The growing number of ocean observatories in both coastal and deep waters around the country are providing scientists with a presence in the ocean 24 hours a day seven days a week. WHOI has built and deployed a number of the existing observatories, including the Long-term Ecosystems Observatory (LEO) off the New Jersey coast, the…

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VERTIGO: Carbon Cycling in the Twilight Zone

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists and their international colleagues will be at sea off Hawaii in June trying to learn more about the ocean’s ability to store atmospheric carbon dioxide. Its all part of a new two-year program called VERTIGO, VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean, to study the flux of sinking particles, which…

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WHOI Chosen One of Top 10 Places for Postdocs to Work

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is one of the ten best places to work for postdoctoral researchers, according to a recent survey of readers of the magazine The Scientist. WHOI ranked eighth in the top ten US institutions.

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New Study Reports Large-scale Salinity Changes in the Oceans

Tropical ocean waters have become dramatically saltier over the past 40 years, while oceans closer to Earth’s poles have become fresher, scientists reported today in the journal Nature. Earth’s warming surface may be intensifying evaporation over oceans in the low latitudes–raising salinity concentrations there–and transporting more fresh water vapor via the atmosphere toward Earth’s poles.

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Scientists Report New Type of Mid-Ocean Ridge in Remote Parts of the Earth

Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have identified a new type of ocean ridge that is spreading so slowly that Earth’s mantle is exposed over large regions of the sea floor. Their findings of a new ultraslow class of ridge, reported in the November 27 issue of the journal Nature, offer a major…

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Formation of Lava Bubbles Offers New Insight into Seafloor Formation

Scientists studying the formation of the sea floor thousands of feet below the surface have a new theory for why there are so many holes and collapsed pits on the ocean bottom. In a recent article in the journal Nature, the researchers say the holes and pits of various sizes are probably formed by lava…

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New Science Channel Program Features WHOI Underwater Vehicles

A number of remotely operated and autonomous underwater vehicles developed and operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to explore the world’s oceans are featured in the new television program “Robots of the Deep,” scheduled for national premier on the Science Channel Friday, November 7, at 9 p.m. EST.

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Two Journalists Honored with New WHOI Ocean Science Journalism Award

Two veteran journalists today received the first Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Ocean Science Journalism Award for their contributions to the public understanding of oceanography. The award, which comes with a $5,000 cash prize and memento, was presented in two categories, print and broadcast journalism, at ceremonies at the Asia Society and Museum in New…

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Geological Tool Helps Scientists Map the Interior of the Ocean

A new application of a decades-old technique to study Earth’s interior is allowing scientists “see” the layers in the ocean, providing new insight on the structure of ocean currents, eddies and mixing processes. The findings, reported in this week’s Science by a team from the University of Wyoming and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), could…

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