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Images: Would a Hagfish By Any Other Name Smell as Sweet?

A dorsal view of the captured hagfish Eptatretus strickrotti, a new species of hagfish captured and named after Alvin pilot Bruce Strickrott. The dark stripe along the back is pigmentation, not a finfold. (Illustration by Karen Jacobsen, In Situ Science Illustration. Figure 1 from Moller, P.R., and W. J. Jones. 2007. Biol. Bull. 212: 40-54. Reproduced with permission from MBL, Woods Hole, Mass.)
The lone specimen of Eptatretus strickrotti has been preserved and stored in the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. (Figure 1 from Moller, P.R., and W. J. Jones. 2007. Biol. Bull. 212: 40-54. Reproduced with permission from MBL, Woods Hole, Mass.)
Alvin pilot Bruce Strickrott, who captured the first specimen of a new species of hagfish now named after him. (Courtesy of NOAA Ocean Explorer)
Bruce Strickrott has piloted more than 200 dives on the WHOI-operated submersible Alvin. (Photo by Mark Spear, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
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