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ITP43 Deployment Operations

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A flag marks the floe selected for the deployment of the IBO containing ITP 43.  The greater freeboard makes the 2.5 m thick floe stand out from the surrounding thin ice. (Rick Krishfield)


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The ITP winch is delivered to the deployment site by long line while others on the ice shelter the lighter weight items on the floe from being blown away by the helicopter propeller wash. (Rick Krishfield)


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Dan MacLean signals the helicopter pilot to lower the O-Buoy into place while Jim Dunn and Kris Newhall guide it into the hole. (Rick Krishfield)


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Under the watchful eye of the CCGS Louis S. St. Laurent, Newhall and Dunn rig the tripod in preparation for the ITP deployment. (Rick Krishfield)


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To make efficient use of the time on the ice, multiple operations are performed simultaneously.  The IMB is installed by one group (left) while the ITP wire is unspooled by another (center), and a third group obtains ice cores (right). (Rick Krishfield)


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ITP 43 as deployed. (Rick Krishfield)


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The IBO as seen from the last helicopter flight back to the ship as dusk approaches. (Rick Krishfield)


On October 6, 2010, the second and final Ice-Based Observatory was to be deployed during the JOIS 2010 expedition.  While the weather and visibility were good for surveying ice floes by helicopter reconnaissance, the ice conditions in the region were not so good.  During the first reconnaissance in the morning, one landing was made on a floe which was less than 1 m thick, and no other reasonable floes were spotted.  In the afternoon reconnaissance no reasonable floes were spotted, so the deployment was postponed.

The following day, a reasonable floe greater than 2 m thick was found on the second landing during the morning helicopter reconnaissance, and the deployments began in the afternoon.  In a little less than 6 hours, the four buoy systems were deployed while other researchers performed detailed ice measurements.  The air temperature dropped throughout the day, and by the end of operations was less than -16° C.

More information and photos on the deployment operations conducted during the IBO deployment are also available at: https://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=66858



Last updated: September 23, 2020
 


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