Oceanus Magazine
Back to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's Homepage

Images: Deep-sea Vents Yield New Species

WHOI's deep-diving vehicle Jason captured this image of shrimp massed around a hydrothermal vent at the Piccard hydrothermal vent site, 3.1 miles deep in the Caribbean. (Photo courtesy of Chris German, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

At the Mid-Cayman Rise, the remotely operated vehicle Jason's suction sampler (or slurp gun) collected tiny snails (white dots) amid bacterial mats, shrimp, and anemones. Jason's manipulator arm sits above the suction tube. (Photo courtesy of Chris German, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

At Mid-Cayman Rise vent sites, scientists found three species of shrimp, two of them new to science. Females of one species were full of orange eggs, a clue to their reproductive timing. (Photo by Julia DeMarines, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

WHOI geochemist Chris German talks to colleagues participating in the "OASES 2012" cruise. German led the expedition to study unusual hydrothermal vents at the Mid-Cayman Rise in January 2012. (Photo by Julia DeMarines, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

WHOI geochemist and engineer Chip Breier (in blue) led the "plume team" (from left, Greg Dick, Sarah Bennett, and Brandy Toner), pictured with the "SUPR" (SUspended Particulate Rosette) sampler that Breier built. (Photo by Julia DeMarines, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Researchers using the remotely operated vehicle Jason (just seen at bottom) found "furry walls" of lush microbial growth near hydrothermal vents 3 miles below the surface. Vent microbes use chemicals for energy to produce food that animals consume. (Photo courtesy of Chris German, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)