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Kate Madin


I was born in California near San Francisco Bay, and childhood summers included fishing in Washington rivers, digging clams on Oregon beaches, and camping from the California redwoods to the Olympic rainforest. Living close to nature and being the daughter of a chemistry teacher, I inclined toward science. At the University of California, Davis, I met my future husband knee-deep in mudflats diging for marine invertebrates. After a year in Bimini on a science-on-a-shoestring expedition to study open-ocean zooplankton, we returned to Davis, moved eastward to WHOI, and I commuted cross-country for a PhD at UCD. I feel very fortunate to have been able to raise a family, stay close to science through writing and education outreach, and work with wonderful, interesting people every day.

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WHOI Opens New Research Facilities

WHOI Opens New Research Facilities

For the first time in 15 years, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has added significant office and laboratory space to its Quissett Campus. This fall, scientists, technical staff, and students started moving into more than 67,000 square feet of new space, a 25 percent increase in the Institution?s scientific facilities.

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Cold Comfort for Barnacles

Cold Comfort for Barnacles

A WHOI research team reports that barnacle larvae can remain frozen up to seven weeks and still revive, settle, and grow to reproduce. The discovery offers a new understanding of barnacle larvae, which are abundant sources of food for larger animals in the coastal ocean. It also provides possible clues to how other intertidal marine invertebrates may settle and survive harsh winters.

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Building an Automated Underwater Microscope

Building an Automated Underwater Microscope

A conversation with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution biologist Heidi Sosik about her work studying phytoplankton ecology in the coastal ocean and the new instrument, the Imaging FlowCytobot, that she and biologist Rob Olson developed. Sosik describes the importance of phytoplankton to the food web and ecology of the coastal ocean, and how this new instrument, which will be deployed this summer, represents a breakthrough in year-round monitoring of coastal phytoplankton communities.

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