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Kate Madin


I was born in California near San Francisco Bay, and childhood summers included fishing in Washington rivers, digging clams on Oregon beaches, and camping from the California redwoods to the Olympic rainforest. Living close to nature and being the daughter of a chemistry teacher, I inclined toward science. At the University of California, Davis, I met my future husband knee-deep in mudflats diging for marine invertebrates. After a year in Bimini on a science-on-a-shoestring expedition to study open-ocean zooplankton, we returned to Davis, moved eastward to WHOI, and I commuted cross-country for a PhD at UCD. I feel very fortunate to have been able to raise a family, stay close to science through writing and education outreach, and work with wonderful, interesting people every day.

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WHOI Earns Reaccreditation

WHOI Earns Reaccreditation

WHOI has been reaccredited as a degree-granting institution by the organization responsible for accrediting New England colleges and universities. The…

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A Warm Eddy Swirling in the Cold Labrador Sea

A Warm Eddy Swirling in the Cold Labrador Sea

Amy Bower is traveling to the Labrador Sea to install a mooring with novel carousels that will autonomously release profiling floats into passing warm eddies. She has also forged an innovative outreach partnership with the Perkins School for the Blind, including an expedition Web sight for students with visual impairments.

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Cell-sized Thermometers

Cell-sized Thermometers

Climate shifts are a repeating feature in Earth’s history, but humans have added so much greenhouse gas (especially carbon dioxide)…

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Abandoned Walrus Calves Reported in the Arctic

Abandoned Walrus Calves Reported in the Arctic

Researchers on an oceanographic voyage in the Arctic Ocean report, for the first time, baby walruses unaccompanied by mothers in areas far from shore and over deep water, where they likely could not survive. The phenomenon was coincident with movement of warm water into Arctic basins and subsequent melting of the sea ice that walruses normally utilize as resting platforms.

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