Press Room

Corals Die as Global Warming Collides with Local Weather in the South China Sea

New research highlights the devastation caused when global-scale ocean warming interacts with short-lived weather anomalies, and adds urgency to the question of how reefs will fare through the end of this century. 

Taking Earth’s Inner Temperature

A new WHOI study suggests the mantle—the mostly solid, rocky part of Earth’s interior that lies between its super-heated core and its outer crustal layer—may be hotter than previously believed. The surprising finding could change how scientists think about many issues in Earth science including how ocean basins form.

A New Long-Term Ecological Research Site Announced for the Northeast U.S. Shelf

To better understand and manage the intricate ecosystem off the Northeast U.S. coast, the National Science Foundation has announced the selection of this critical ocean region for a new Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site led by WHOI.

Panel to Discuss Deep-Sea Mining at AAAS Meeting

Home to an immense diversity of marine life, the deep ocean also contains valuable minerals with metals such as nickel, copper, cobalt, manganese, zinc, and gold, and rare-earth elements used in electronic technology like smart phones and medical imaging machines. As demand for these resources increases and supplies on land decrease, commercial mining operators are looking to the deep ocean as the next frontier for mining.

Study Provides Measurement of Nitrogen Removal by Local Shellfish

A new study by Woods Hole Sea Grant, Cape Cod Cooperative Extension, and the Mashpee Department of Natural Resources provides the first comprehensive measurement of nitrogen removed by shellfish harvested from waters off Cape Cod.

Town of Falmouth and WHOI Win Seaport Economic Council Grant

At a meeting Thursday in Fall River, members of the Massachusetts Seaport Economic Council (SEC) green-lighted a $500,000 grant request from the Town of Falmouth and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). The award will go toward a feasibility study for the replacement of the WHOI dock on Water Street in Woods Hole.

Antarctic Bottom Waters Freshening at Unexpected Rate

In the cold depths along the sea floor, Antarctic Bottom Waters are part of a critical part of the global circulatory system. Over the last decade, scientists have been monitoring changes in these waters, but a new WHOI study suggests these changes are themselves shifting in unexpected ways, with potentially significant consequences for the ocean and climate.

Salty Oceans Can Forecast Rain on Land

At this week’s American Geophysical Union meeting, a team of researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) presented their latest research findings on the long-range predictions of rainfall on land. Their method is based on ocean salinity rather than sea surface temperatures, which has been the standard for decades.

Stan Hart Receives AGU's Highest Honor

Stan Hart, WHOI scientist emeritus, has been awarded the American Geophysical Union's (AGU) highest honor, the William Bowie Medal. The Honors Tribute was held on Wednesday, 14 December 2016, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Some Fish Quickly Adapt to Lethal Levels of Pollution

Killifish living in four polluted East Coast estuaries have adapted to survive levels of toxic industrial pollutants that would normally kill them, tolerating concentrations up to 8,000 times higher than sensitive fish. A new study reveals the complex genetic basis for the Atlantic killifish’s remarkable resilience.

New Studies Take a Second Look at Coral Bleaching Culprit

A new study from WHOI indicates that superoxide—a natural toxin believed to be the main culprit behind coral bleaching—may actually play a beneficial role in coral health and resilience.

WHOI Geologist Henry Dick Named AAAS 2016 Fellow

Henry Dick of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon association members by their peers.

New Study Explains Mysterious Source of Greenhouse Gas Methane in the Ocean

A new study may have cracked the longstanding “marine methane paradox,” finding that the answer may lie in the complex ways that bacteria break down substances excreted into seawater by living organisms.

WHOI Scientist Receives Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation Award

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation selected Mak Saito, a biogeochemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), as one of eight awardees of a 2016 Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry grant. 

WHOI Study Sheds Light on Previously Overlooked Aspect of Whale Songs

Researchers have known for decades that whales create elaborate songs, sometimes projecting their calls for miles underwater. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, has revealed a previously unknown element of whale songs that could aid this mode of communication, and may play a pivotal role in locating other whales in open ocean.

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WHOI in the News

'Devastating' coral loss in South China Sea - scientists
BBC News

Earth's Mantle Is Hotter Than Scientists Thought
Scientific American

Long-term study examines ocean ecosystems off Vineyard
The Boston Globe

Fukushima radiation not cause for alarm in US
Associated Press

Coral reefs might be in more trouble than we thought
Popular Science

Navy Turns to Local Scientist to Reduce Oil Spill Risk
WCAI - Living Lab