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Allie Gage


Allie Gage grew up on Cape Cod, where she took an early liking to all things outdoors—the ocean most notably. Growing up immersed in the scientific community of Falmouth, it may not come as a total surprise that Gage remains loyal to the study of the natural world.

Currently a senior Environmental Science & Policy major at Smith College in Northampton, Mass., she enjoys unraveling the technicalities of research, distilling information, and forging coherence.  Gage happily spent the past summer at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution writing for Oceanus magazine, where she was able to put this pursuit into practice.

Gage enjoys spending time at the beach with a good book, playing ice hockey, competitive board/card games, and attempting to eat any- and everything that the restaurants of Northampton have to offer.

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It’s Hard to Kill a Killifish

It's Hard to Kill a Killifish

Summer Student Fellow Lily Helfrich is using a new molecular tool, microRNA analysis, to explore why some killifish are able to thrive in waters heavily contaminated with PCBs.

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A Summer of Science by the Sea, 2014 (Part II)

A Summer of Science by the Sea, 2014 (Part II)

Every summer since 1959, undergraduates from around the world have come to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for a program to learn about ocean science and conduct research under the guidance of WHOI scientists. Read the second and final installment of our series of profiles of this year’s young scholars.

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Sea Science in the Space Age

Sea Science in the Space Age

South Asian monsoons bring huge amounts of fresh water into the Bay of Bengal. Summer Student Fellow Mara Freilich used huge data sets from satellites to how and where the salinity of the Bay changes as a result.

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Swimming in Low-pH Seas

Swimming in Low-pH Seas

Researchers knew that squid raised in acidified water developed abnormal balance organs. To find out whether the young squid could still balance and swim normally, Summer Student Fellow Doriane Weiler mapped their movements.

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Surface Waters Go Their Own Way

Surface Waters Go Their Own Way

Summer Student Fellow Sam Kastner found that at a given spot in the ocean, water at the surface may not be moving the same direction or speed as water deeper down—which can make predicting the path of nutrients or pollutants very challenging.

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Scallops Under Stress

Scallops Under Stress

Like other marine species, scallops face multiple climate change-related problems. Summer Student Fellow Cailan Sugano studied how scallops respond to acidification and lack of food—and whether extra food can help them resist damage due to more acidic seawater.

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