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News Releases

21-40 of 118 results

New Study Provides First Field Observations of Rare Omura's Whales

An international team of biologists has made the first-ever field observations of one of the least known species of whales in the world—Omura's whales—off the coast of Madagascar.

Novel Tag Developed for Squid, Jellyfish

Invertebrates, such as squid and jellyfish, play a crucial role in the marine food web and are also vital commercial fisheries. Despite their importance, little is known about their natural behaviors or how their environment influences those behaviors or physiology. A new data-logging tag, called the ITAG, developed specifically for small and delicate invertebrates not only quantifies ocean conditions but also measures animals’ responses to their physical environments in high resolution.

Climate Change Will Irreversibly Force Key Ocean Bacteria into Overdrive

Scientists demonstrate that a key organism in the ocean’s food web will start reproducing at high speed as carbon dioxide levels rise, with no way to stop when nutrients become scarce.

WHOI, NEAQ Embark on Expedition to the Phoenix Islands

A research team led by the New England Aquarium (NEAQ) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) are heading out on a 6,000-mile expedition to one of the most remote places on Earth—the Phoenix Islands in the central Pacific Ocean. Throughout the month of September and in the midst of a strengthening Pacific El Nino, researchers will investigate the combined effects of climate change and human activity on the these vast coral reef ecosystems and the diversity of life they sustain. 

Evidence of Ancient Life Discovered in Mantle Rocks Deep Below the Seafloor

Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports a team of scientists, confirming a long-standing hypothesis that interactions between mantle rocks and seawater can create potential for life even in hard rocks deep below the ocean floor.

Ultrasounds for Coral Reefs?

Scientists have tested a surprisingly cheap and effective way to assess the health of vulnerable coral reefs and to monitor threats on remote atolls: eavesdropping.

Shifting Winds, Ocean Currents Doubled Endangered Galapagos Penguin Population

Shifts in trade winds and ocean currents powered a resurgence of endangered Galapagos Penguins over the past 30 years, according to a new study. These changes enlarged a cold pool of water the penguins rely on for food and breeding—an expansion that could continue as the climate changes over the coming decades, according to a new study led by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

Whale Research Takes Flight

A research team has successfully demonstrated a new non-invasive tool to obtain hard-to-get health measurements of large endangered whales in the wild.

Deep-Sea Images Give New View of Arctic Ocean Methane Seeps

WHOI scientists and colleagues from the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate in Norway collected nearly 30,000 high definition images at known methane release sites in the Arctic Ocean. The detailed images will provide new insights into the most remote areas of natural methane releases in the world.

Camera's Eye Sees Large Numbers of Young Scallops Off Delaware Bay

NOAA researchers and colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have reported what appears to be a banner year for young sea scallops off the Delmarva Peninsula in mid-Atlantic waters of the U.S.

Diverse Corals Persist, But Bioerosion Escalates in Palau's Low-pH Waters

As the ocean absorbs atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) released by the burning of fossil fuels, its chemistry is changing, lowering its pH in a process known as ocean acidification. This process also removes carbonate ions, an essential ingredient needed by corals and other organisms to build their skeletons and shells.

 

Securing the Supply of Sea Scallops for Today and Tomorrow

Good management has brought the $559 million United States sea scallop fishery back from the brink of collapse over the past 20 years. However, its current fishery management plan does not account for longer-term environmental change like ocean warming and acidification that may affect the fishery in the future. A group of researchers from WHOI, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, and Ocean Conservancy hope to change that. 

Swirling Currents Deliver Phytoplankton Carbon to Ocean Depths

Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal renewal and the start of a warmer season on land, a similar "greening" event—a massive phytoplankton bloom—unfolds each spring in the Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic.  But, what happens to all that organic material produced in the surface ocean?

Nereid Under Ice Vehicle: A Powerful New Tool for Polar Science

Scientists studying the harsh and rapidly changing Arctic environment now have a valuable new tool to advance their work—an innovative robot, designed and built at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) that is changing the way scientists can interact with and observe the polar environment.

New Museum Exhibit Explores Deep Ocean Environment

In collaboration with the Ocean Explorium in New Bedford, WHOI has created new digital content for museum-based spherical display systems that brings high-definition images and video of dynamic, deep ocean ecosystems to the public.

David Gallo Selected for Explorers Club Lowell Thomas Award

The Explorers Club has chosen David Gallo, Director of Special Projects at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), as one of the recipients of this year's Lowell Thomas Award. He is among six recipients who will be honored for their "imagination in exploration" at a dinner on October 11, 2014, at the Bowers Museum in Southern California.

REMUS SharkCam Captures Upclose Encounters with Great Whites

When a team from WHOI took a specially equipped REMUS SharkCam underwater vehicle to Guadalupe Island in Mexico to film great white sharks in the wild, they captured more than they bargained for.

Tags Reveal Chilean Devil Rays Are Among Ocean's Deepest Divers

Thought to dwell mostly near the ocean's surface, Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) are most often seen gliding through shallow, warm waters. But a new study by scientists at WHOI and international colleagues reveals that these large and majestic creatures are actually among the deepest-diving ocean animals.

Study Finds Emperor Penguin in Peril

An international team of scientists studying Emperor penguin populations across Antarctica finds the iconic animals in danger of dramatic declines by the end of the century due to climate change.

Climate Change Winners and Losers

A group of scientists have traced the genetics of modern penguin populations back to their early ancestors from the last Ice Age to better understand how three Antarctic penguin species – gentoo, Adélie, and chinstrap penguins – fared in response to past climate change.

21-40 of 118 results