Refine by date:

From:

To:

Refine by topic:

[clear]

News Releases

1-20 of 35 results

Volcanic Arcs Form by Deep Melting of Rock Mixtures

A new study published in the journal Science Advances changes our understanding of how volcanic arc lavas are formed, and may have implications for the study of earthquakes and the risks of volcanic eruption. 

Taking Earth’s Inner Temperature

A new WHOI study suggests the mantle—the mostly solid, rocky part of Earth’s interior that lies between its super-heated core and its outer crustal layer—may be hotter than previously believed. The surprising finding could change how scientists think about many issues in Earth science including how ocean basins form.

Panel to Discuss Deep-Sea Mining at AAAS Meeting

Home to an immense diversity of marine life, the deep ocean also contains valuable minerals with metals such as nickel, copper, cobalt, manganese, zinc, and gold, and rare-earth elements used in electronic technology like smart phones and medical imaging machines. As demand for these resources increases and supplies on land decrease, commercial mining operators are looking to the deep ocean as the next frontier for mining.

WHOI Geologist Henry Dick Named AAAS 2016 Fellow

Henry Dick of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon association members by their peers.

Swarming Red Crabs Documented on Video

A research team studying biodiversity at the Hannibal Bank Seamount off the coast of Panama has captured unique video of thousands of red crabs swarming in low-oxygen waters just above the seafloor. 

Galapagos Expedition Reveals Unknown Seamounts, New Species

During a three-week expedition in August, an international team conducted the first scientific expedition to map and characterize the seamounts on the Galápagos platform.

Examining the Fate of Fukushima Contaminants

An international research team reports results of a three-year study of sediment samples collected offshore from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in a new paper published August 18, 2015, in the American Chemical Society's journal, Environmental Science and Technology. The research aids in understanding what happens to Fukushima contaminants after they are buried on the seafloor off coastal Japan.

Carbon Dioxide Pools Discovered in Aegean Sea

The waters off Greece’s Santorini are the site of newly discovered opalescent pools forming at 250 meters depth. The interconnected series of meandering, iridescent white pools contain high concentrations of CO2 and may hold answers to questions related to deepsea carbon storage as well as provide a means of monitoring the volcano for future eruptions.

Deep-Sea Images Give New View of Arctic Ocean Methane Seeps

WHOI scientists and colleagues from the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate in Norway collected nearly 30,000 high definition images at known methane release sites in the Arctic Ocean. The detailed images will provide new insights into the most remote areas of natural methane releases in the world.

Anna Michel Receives Gulf Research Program Early-Career Research Fellowship

WHOI assistant scientist Anna Michel was chosen by the National Academy of Sciences to receive a 2015 Gulf Research Program Early-Career Research Fellowship.

Making Organic Molecules in Hydrothermal Vents in the Absence of Life

A new study is the first to show that methane formation does not occur during the relatively quick fluid circulation process.

WHOI Receives $150,000 Grant from Tower Foundation

The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation has awarded the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) a $150,000 grant that will help fund a three-year collaborative project with Cape Abilities—a nonprofit organization dedicated to finding good jobs for Cape Cod residents with disabilities.

Study Finds Deep Ocean is Source of Dissolved Iron in Central Pacific

A new study led by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) points to the deep ocean as a major source of dissolved iron in the central Pacific Ocean.

Newly discovered ocean plume could be major source of iron

Scientists have discovered a vast plume of iron and other micronutrients more than 1,000 km wide billowing from hydrothermal vents in the South Atlantic Ocean. The finding, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, calls past estimates of iron abundances into question, and may challenge researchers’ assumptions about iron sources in the world’s seas.

Explorer and Filmmaker James Cameron Gives DEEPSEA CHALLENGER Sub to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

On the one-year anniversary of Explorer and filmmaker James Cameron’s unprecedented solo dive to the Challenger Deep in the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible, Cameron and WHOI announce he will transfer the sub to Woods Hole. The transfer is part of a newly formed a partnership to stimulate advances in ocean science and technology and build on the historic breakthroughs of the 2012  DEEPSEA CHALLENGE expedition.

WHOI Researchers, Collaborators Receive $1.4 Million to Study Life in Ocean's Greatest Depths

Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), University of Hawaii, Whitman College and international colleagues will conduct the first systematic study of life in the deepest marine habitat on Earth—ocean trenches.

WHOI scientists find ancient asphalt domes off California coast

They paved paradise and, it turns out, actually did put up a parking lot. A big one. Some 700 feet deep in the waters off California’s jewel of a coastal resort, Santa Barbara, sits a group of football-field-sized asphalt domes unlike any other underwater features known to exist.

Long-Distance Larvae Speed to New Undersea Vent Homes

Working in a rare, “natural seafloor laboratory” of hydrothermal vents that had just been rocked by a volcanic eruption, scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and other institutions have discovered what they believe is an undersea superhighway carrying tiny life forms unprecedented distances to inhabit the post-eruption site.

WHOI contributes to special seamount issue of Oceanography magazine

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) biologist Timothy M. Shank is among five guest editors of a newly published special edition of the research journal Oceanography on the oceans’ seamounts, submerged isolated mountains in the sea. Shank is also a contributing author to the special Oceanography edition.

Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle Nereus Reaches Deepest Part of the Ocean

A new type of deep-sea robotic vehicle called Nereus has successfully reached the deepest part of the world’s ocean, reports a team of U.S. engineers and scientists aboard the research vessel Kilo Moana. The dive to 10,902 meters (6.8 miles) occurred on May 31, 2009, at the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific Ocean.

1-20 of 35 results