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News Releases

1-20 of 47 results

New Studies Take a Second Look at Coral Bleaching Culprit

A new study from WHOI indicates that superoxide—a natural toxin believed to be the main culprit behind coral bleaching—may actually play a beneficial role in coral health and resilience.

New Study Explains Mysterious Source of Greenhouse Gas Methane in the Ocean

A new study may have cracked the longstanding “marine methane paradox,” finding that the answer may lie in the complex ways that bacteria break down substances excreted into seawater by living organisms.

Study Reveals Corals' Influence on Reef Microbes

In novel lab observations of interactions between corals and planktonic bacteria, known as picoplankton, researchers found that corals are selectively feeding on specific types of bacteria—the same bacteria whose growth is promoted by organic matter and nutrients that are released by the corals.

Climate Change Will Irreversibly Force Key Ocean Bacteria into Overdrive

Scientists demonstrate that a key organism in the ocean’s food web will start reproducing at high speed as carbon dioxide levels rise, with no way to stop when nutrients become scarce.

Evidence of Ancient Life Discovered in Mantle Rocks Deep Below the Seafloor

Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports a team of scientists, confirming a long-standing hypothesis that interactions between mantle rocks and seawater can create potential for life even in hard rocks deep below the ocean floor.

River Buries Permafrost Carbon at Sea

As temperatures rise, some of the carbon dioxide stored in Arctic permafrost meets an unexpected fate—burial at sea. As many as 2.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year are swept along by a single river system into Arctic Ocean sediment, according to a new study.

Where Iron and Water Mix

New research proves that the dissolved metals from hydrothermal plumes follow deep-sea currents to provide a major source of iron to the world's oceans.

Anna Michel Receives Gulf Research Program Early-Career Research Fellowship

WHOI assistant scientist Anna Michel was chosen by the National Academy of Sciences to receive a 2015 Gulf Research Program Early-Career Research Fellowship.

Diverse Corals Persist, But Bioerosion Escalates in Palau's Low-pH Waters

As the ocean absorbs atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) released by the burning of fossil fuels, its chemistry is changing, lowering its pH in a process known as ocean acidification. This process also removes carbonate ions, an essential ingredient needed by corals and other organisms to build their skeletons and shells.

 

Study Reveals How Rivers Regulate Global Carbon Cycle

Scientists from WHOI calculated the first direct estimate of how much and in what form organic carbon is exported to the ocean by rivers.

Securing the Supply of Sea Scallops for Today and Tomorrow

Good management has brought the $559 million United States sea scallop fishery back from the brink of collapse over the past 20 years. However, its current fishery management plan does not account for longer-term environmental change like ocean warming and acidification that may affect the fishery in the future. A group of researchers from WHOI, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, and Ocean Conservancy hope to change that. 

Ocean Bacteria Get 'Pumped Up'

Scientists have discovered a surprising new short-circuit to the biological pump. Sinking particles of stressed and dying phytoplankton release chemicals that can have a jolting, steroid-like effect on marine bacteria feeding on the particles.

Swirling Currents Deliver Phytoplankton Carbon to Ocean Depths

Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal renewal and the start of a warmer season on land, a similar "greening" event—a massive phytoplankton bloom—unfolds each spring in the Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic.  But, what happens to all that organic material produced in the surface ocean?

Study Finds Deep Ocean is Source of Dissolved Iron in Central Pacific

A new study led by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) points to the deep ocean as a major source of dissolved iron in the central Pacific Ocean.

Coral Reefs Threatened by a Deadly Combination of Changing Ocean Conditions

A new study shows exposing corals to added nutrients increases their erosion and dissolution rate tenfold.

Scientists Apply Biomedical Technique to Reveal Changes Within the Body of the Ocean

In a study published in the journal Science, a research team led by WHOI demonstrated that they can identify and measure proteins in the ocean, revealing how singled-celled marine organisms and ocean ecosystems are operating.

Mercury in the Global Ocean

WHOI scientists report on the first direct calculation of global mercury pollution in the world's ocean. The study shows three times more mercury in upper ocean since the Industrial Revolution.

Coral Reefs in Palau Surprisingly Resistant to Naturally Acidified Waters

Ocean researchers working on the coral reefs of Palau in 2011 and 2012 made two unexpected discoveries that could provide insight into corals’ resistance and resilience to ocean acidification and aid in the creation of a plan to protect them.

Newly discovered ocean plume could be major source of iron

Scientists have discovered a vast plume of iron and other micronutrients more than 1,000 km wide billowing from hydrothermal vents in the South Atlantic Ocean. The finding, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, calls past estimates of iron abundances into question, and may challenge researchers’ assumptions about iron sources in the world’s seas.

Acidifying oceans could spell trouble for squid

Acidifying oceans could dramatically impact the world’s squid species, and because squid are both ecologically and commercially important, that impact may have far-reaching effects on the ocean environment and coastal economies, the researchers report.

1-20 of 47 results