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Hauke Kite-Powell

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Where Will We Get Our Seafood?

Where Will We Get Our Seafood?

By 2030 or 2040, most seafood bought by Americans will be raised on a farm, not caught by fishermen. And, unless policies governing aquaculture in the United States change, the vast majority of seafood eaten…

Tara Hetz

Tara Hetz

Tara Hetz has gotten to see a different side of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) from her Summer Student Fellow (SSF) peers this summer as the sole fellow at the Marine Policy Center. With WHOI…

Farming Shellfish in Zanzibar

Farming Shellfish in Zanzibar

To Fertilize, or Not to Fertilize

To Fertilize, or Not to Fertilize

Global warming is “unequivocal,” the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported in November 2007. Human actions—particularly the burning of fossil fuels—have dramatically raised carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, leading our…

Proposals Emerge to Transfer Excess Carbon into the Ocean

Proposals Emerge to Transfer Excess Carbon into the Ocean

It’s sort of the planetary equivalent of moving clutter accumulating in the attic to other storage space in the basement: transferring excess heat-trapping carbon dioxide from Earth’s atmosphere into the deep ocean. A combination of…

Dumping Iron and Trading Carbon

Dumping Iron and Trading Carbon

Debating the idea of fertilizing the ocean with iron can feel a little like riding a seesaw. On the up side is iron’s eye-catching potential to set off enormous plankton blooms, triggering large reductions in…

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Fertilizing the Ocean with Iron

  “Give me half a tanker of iron, and I’ll give you an ice age” may rank as the catchiest line ever uttered by a biogeochemist. The man responsible was the late John Martin, former…

A Modest Proposal to Sustain Lobsters and Lobstermen

A Modest Proposal to Sustain Lobsters and Lobstermen

A new study by a WHOI scientist and a former lobsterman suggests a provocative lobster management strategy that offers economic benefits to the lobster fishermen, while invigorating lobster stocks.

A Whole New Kettle of Fish

A Whole New Kettle of Fish

With most of the world?s fisheries already fully exploited or overexploited, the wild catch will not meet increasing worldwide demand for seafood?which the U.S. Department of Commerce projects will triple by 2025. The United States…

In and Out of Harm's Way

In and Out of Harm’s Way

Just a few more miles or a few more minutes. That’s what scientists and some federal managers think it would take to improve the plight of the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale. No more…