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1-8 of 8 results

Antarctic Bottom Waters Freshening at Unexpected Rate

In the cold depths along the sea floor, Antarctic Bottom Waters are part of a critical part of the global circulatory system. Over the last decade, scientists have been monitoring changes in these waters, but a new WHOI study suggests these changes are themselves shifting in unexpected ways, with potentially significant consequences for the ocean and climate.

New Study Projects That Melting of Antarctic Ice Shelves Will Intensify

New research projects a doubling of surface melting of Antarctic ice shelves by 2050 and by 2100 may surpass intensities associated with ice shelf collapse, if greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel consumption continues at the present rate.

Sudden Draining of Glacial Lakes Explained

Scientists have found a surprising mechanism that triggers the abrupt draining of glacial lakes atop the Greenland Ice Sheet.

Understanding the Ocean's Role in Greenland Glacier Melt

Research by scientists at WHOI and the Univ. of Oregon sheds new light onto the connection between the ocean and Greenland’s outlet glaciers, and provides important data for future estimates of how fast the ice sheet will melt and how much mass will be lost.

New Coral Dating Method Hints at Possible Future Sea-Level Changes

New evidence of sea-level oscillations during a warm period that started about 125,000 years ago raises the possibility of a similar scenario if the planet continues its more recent warming trend, says a research team led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

WHOI Will Host Public Forum on Sea Level Rise

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that sea level may rise as much as two feet over the next 100 years.  However, we lack a full understanding of polar ice cap behavior, and there is concern that the potential for future sea level rise may be significantly underestimated.  On Friday, September 25, 2009, from 2 – 5 p.m., in Redfield Auditorium, Water Street, Woods Hole, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is hosting a free public colloquium entitled “Where Land & Sea Meet: Managing Shoreline Change Over the Next 100 Years.”

Rapid Sea Level Rise in the Arctic Ocean May Alter Views of Human Migration

Scientists have found new evidence that the Bering Strait near Alaska flooded into the Arctic Ocean about 11,000 years ago, about 1,000 years earlier than widely believed, closing off the land bridge thought to be the major route for human migration from Asia to the Americas.

New Coral Dating Technique Helps Resolve Changes in Sea Level Rise in the Past

Corals from Papua New Guinea and Barbados indicate that changes in sea level, one of the key indexes for global climate change, may have been more frequent in the past than previously thought.

1-8 of 8 results