Please note: You are viewing the unstyled version of this website. Either your browser does not support CSS (cascading style sheets) or it has been disabled. Skip navigation.

Image : Marine Mammal Center

  Email    Print  PDF  Change text to small (default) Change text to medium Change text to large

Scientists and engineers from WHOI and the U.S. Navy have discovered that sea turtles? skulls and shells not only protect them from predators but also from extraordinarily powerful underwater shockwaves.
Scientists and engineers from WHOI and the U.S. Navy have discovered that sea turtles’ skulls and shells not only protect them from predators but also from extraordinarily powerful underwater shockwaves. This three-dimensional reconstruction from CT scans performed at the WHOI Computerized Scanning and Imaging Facility shows a posterior view of a loggerhead sea turtle skull — both the skull's plate-like structure and the deep archways, which shield the ear, brain, and spinal cord from pressure waves. The research, originally intended to help the Navy avoid harming turtles, could also point the way to designing improved body armor and helmets for soldiers on land. (Darlene Ketten, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Computerized Scanning and Imaging Facility)

[back]


Last updated: March 11, 2010
 


whoi logo

Copyright ©2007 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, All Rights Reserved, Privacy Policy.
Problems or questions about the site, please contact webdev@whoi.edu