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Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Sarah B. Das

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Publications
»Antarctic meltwater flux, GRL, 2013
»Tropical Pacific influence on W. Antarctic marine aerosols, J. Climate, 2013
»Thwaites Glacier, Antarctica accumulation, GRL, 2013
»ACCMIP multi-model global nitrogen and sulfur deposition dataset, ACP, 2013
»Influence of ice sheet geometry and supraglacial lakes on seasonal ice flow, TC, 2013
»Greenland Iron Export, Nature Geosc, 2013
»Greenland Organic Carbon Export, GCA, 2013
»Amundsen Coast Sea Ice and Polynya Variability, JGR, 2013
»Ice Core 10Be Records, EPSL, 2012
»Antarctic Ice Sheet Surface Melting, JGR, 2012
»Greenland discharge isotope mixing model, J. Glac., 2011
»Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, NRC Report, 2011
»Greenland Ice Sheet DOM, GCA, 2010
»Ice Sheet Hydrofracture and Water-transport Model, GRL, 2009
»Greenland Supraglacial Lake Drainage, Science, 2008
»Greenland Seasonal Speedup, Science, 2008
»West Antarctica Holocene Climate, JGR, 2008
»Greenland Accumulation, J. Climate, 2006
»Melt Layer Formation, J. Glac, 2005
»Whillans Ice Stream Deceleration, GRL, 2005
»Siple Dome Temperature Variability, Annals Glac., 2002
»Patagonian Icefield SAR, JGR, 1996


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Zapol, W.M., R.E. Bell, D.H. Bromwich, T.F. Budinger, J.E. Carlstrom, R.R. Colwell, S.B. Das, H.W. Ducklow, P. Huybers, J.L. King, R.E. Lopez, O. Orheim, S.B. Prusiner, M. Raphael, P. Schlosser, L.D. Talley, and D. H. Wall, Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean: National Research Council of the National Academies Report, The National Academies Press, Washington D.C., 2011

Antarctica and the surrounding Southern Ocean remains one of the world's last frontiers. Covering nearly 14 million km² (an area approximately 1.4 times the size of the United States), Antarctica is the coldest, driest, highest, and windiest continent on Earth. While it is challenging to live and work in this extreme environment, this region offers many opportunities for scientific research. Ever since the first humans set foot on Antarctica a little more than a century ago, the discoveries made there have advanced our scientific knowledge of the region, the world, and the Universe--but there is still much more to learn. However, conducting scientific research in the harsh environmental conditions of Antarctica is profoundly challenging. Substantial resources are needed to establish and maintain the infrastructure needed to provide heat, light, transportation, and drinking water, while at the same time minimizing pollution of the environment and ensuring the safety of researchers.

Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean suggests actions for the United States to achieve success for the next generation of Antarctic and Southern Ocean science. The report highlights important areas of research by encapsulating each into a single, overarching question. The questions fall into two broad themes: (1) those related to global change, and (2) those related to fundamental discoveries. In addition, the report identified key science questions that will drive research in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in coming decades, and highlighted opportunities to be leveraged to sustain and improve the U.S. research efforts in the region.


Link to full report here

FILE » Report in brief



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