SEISORZ

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Map of the SEISORZ seismic profile across the Okavango rift, Botswana. (J.P. Canales)


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Training of SEISORZ participants. (J.P. Canales)


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Mike Johnson (IRIS PASSCAL) demonstrates the installation of a geophone. (J.P. Canales)


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In addition to training on the operation of seismometers, SEISORZ participants are given a short course on off-road driving in the Kalahari by WHOI's Res. Assoc. Jimmy Elsenbeck (center). (J.P. Canales)


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Mike Johnson (left) and Derrick Hess (IRIS PASSCAL) work hard overnight to program the 900 'Texans' instruments (J.P. Canales)


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Fronm left, Dorsey Wanless (Boise State Univ.) and MIT/WHOI Joint Program students Greg Horning and Laura Stevens show off their GoPros. (J.P. Canales)


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Time to take out batteries and clean up. (J.P. Canales)


SEISORZ is the active-source seismic component of the PRIDE project.  The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa rift system, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi.  The SEISORZ experiment focuses on the rift in Botswana, and in particular the rift graben in northwestern Botswana that hosts the Okavango delta.  The scientific objectives of the SEISORZ experiment are to image the crustal structure across the rift and use this image to estimate total extension, determine the pattern thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrast in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a mobile belt.

 

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Last updated September 11, 2015
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