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Images: Scientists Find that Squid Can Detect Sounds

WHOI postdoctoral scholar Aran Mooney seeks to understand how squid sense sounds in the water. He has investigated squid sound-sensing organs, called statocysts, which have intriguing similarities to mammalian ears and might someday be useful as a model system for studying human hearing. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Loligo pealii, the small species of squid whose ability to detect sound is being investigated by postdoctoral scholar Aran Mooney. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

To study squid physiology while they are still alive, postdoctoral scholar Aran Mooney and colleagues developed novel noninvasive methods to anethetize squid for long periods of time. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Researcher Aran Mooney sets a squid into a tank where its neural response to sounds will be measured. The squid has been anesthetized and fitted with an electrode that will detect signals sent to the brain by nerves connected to sensory organs called statocysts. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)