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Colossal Clams

Colossal Clams

Giant clams up to one foot long thrive in the crevices around seafloor pillow lava. This vent site on the Galápagos Rift, discovered in 2002, is called “Calyfield” after the […]

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A Berlin Wall on the Ocean Floor

A Berlin Wall on the Ocean Floor

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the equator is offset by huge faults called fracture zones, through which a strong deep current flows. This physical barrier may block the transport of vent […]

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Desert Discovery

Desert Discovery

In a few places on Earth, blocks of oceanic crust called ophiolites have been thrust onto the continents, giving scientists a firsthand look at rock formations that were once beneath […]

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Manhattan Mixing

Manhattan Mixing

Jay Sisson (left) and Craig Marquette maneuver a box corer after plucking a sediment sample from the bottom of the Hudson River for studies of how sediment accumulates along this […]

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Icy Rest

Icy Rest

The R/V Laurence M. Gould, docked after a 2002 winter cruise, dwarfs the buildings of the U.S. research outpost at Palmer Station, Antarctica. (Photo by Peter Wiebe, Woods Hole Oceanographic […]

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Carbon Chemistry

Carbon Chemistry

Fabian Batista works in the sample preparation lab in the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility, a precision radiocarbon dating laboratory, at WHOI. (Photograph by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole […]

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Primed for Catastrophic Collapse

Primed for Catastrophic Collapse

Rising 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) above the Samoan island of Ta’u, Mount Lata is an active volcano. One of its sides collapsed in landslides that left a steep escarpment primed […]

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Dangerous Drifters

Dangerous Drifters

Dennis McGillicuddy launches a satellite-tracked drifter into the Bay of Fundy to examine how ocean currents circulate water and the harmful algae Alexandrium into and out of the bay. […]

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Rainbow Rock

Rainbow Rock

A thin section of pyroxene from the Indian Ocean with colors produced by light passing up through a polarizer and the rock’s crystal lattice. Earth’s upper mantle is composed mainly […]

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Penguins on Parade

Penguins on Parade

Macquarie Island, a tiny island between Tasmania and Antarctica in the Southern Ocean, is home to large colonies of Royal penguins and other animals. The island is a Tasmanian State […]

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Going, Going, Gone

Going, Going, Gone

Swimmers secure the submersible Alvin‘s science basket in the front of the vehicle at the start of another dive. The sub makes about 175 dives each year to depths of […]

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Open Wide

Open Wide

A giant tubeworm in its protective white tube, collected during the 2005 Galapagos Rift expedition, is examined by biologist Breea Govenar aboard ship. The expedition was featured on the WHOI […]

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Home Port

Home Port

An aerial view of the village of Woods Hole, with the Institution dock facilities at the center. WHOI research vessels Knorr, Oceanus, and Atlantis are home, a rare occurrence. (Woods […]

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Stormy Seas

Stormy Seas

Veteran seagoing WHOI researchers Craig Marquette (left) and Will Ostrom deploy a mooring with tiny temperature probes from R/V Oceanus during a gale off Cape Hatteras. (Photo by Chris Linder, […]

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Ross Sea 2006

Ross Sea 2006

WHOI geochemist Mak Saito joined an international research team aboard the icebreaker Nathaniel B. Palmer in the austral summer of 2005-06 to explore the ecological struggle between two major groups […]

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Clues in a Caldera

Clues in a Caldera

In March 2006, WHOI geochemist Ken Sims climbed into Masaya Volcano in Nicaragua to collect gas samples. By gathering samples worldwide, Sims is exploring how volcanic gases cause climate changes […]

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All Ears

All Ears

To learn about marine mammal hearing, researchers use the new WHOI necropsy and CT scan facility to reveal the internal anatomy of ears. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic […]

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Outposts of the Deep

Outposts of the Deep

A tall, portable light system, the “deep-sea light post,” illuminates a portion of Hulk, a 25-meter (82-foot) hydrothermal chimney located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge off Seattle. (Woods Hole […]

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Colorful Currents

Colorful Currents

A complex circulation system in the Arctic Ocean is designated by red and blue arrows (warm and cold water). WHOI scientists and engineers are exploring how global climate change is […]

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Biological Bongos

Biological Bongos

Twin plankton nets, called ‘bongo nets’, hang over the side of a ship. The nets are towed through the water to capture copepods, which are counted to track their abundance […]

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Down the Hatch

Down the Hatch

It took two weeks for eight members of the Alvin Group to remove thousands of bolts, hoses, panels, and the submersible’s 6-foot titanium personnel sphere during its periodic overhaul in […]

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Blue Water Over the Rail

Blue Water Over the Rail

Twenty-foot waves pummeled R/V Oceanus in the Gulf Stream off Cape Hatteras. (Photo by Christopher Linder, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

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Follow that Float

Follow that Float

Seaman Clindor Cacho works on the R/V Oceanus guiding floats as they are prepared for deployment into the Irminger Sea east of Greenland. (Photo by Chris Linder, Woods Hole Oceanographic […]

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