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Zach Deputy performs Wash it in the Water at Ocean Encounters

Watch Zach Deputy perform Wash it in the Water, a song inspired by his admiration for the ocean. Zach describes the ocean as a system reboot, a place you can take your worries and wash them in the water. This performance took place during WHOI’s 2020 Ocean Encounters finale episode entitled Our Enchanted Ocean and was recorded on October 28, 2020.

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An Ocean Poem: spoken word performance at Ocean Encounters

Watch Victoria Bautista perform An Ocean Poem a spoken word about the mysterious life that lurks below the ocean surface. This performance took place during WHOI’s 2020 Ocean Encounters finale episode entitled Our Enchanted Ocean and was recorded on October 28, 2020.

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Boston Dance Theater performs SURGE at Ocean Encounters

Watch Boston Dance Theater (BDT) perform their current art and science project called SURGE which is an ongoing collaboration between BDT and WHOI Senior Scientist, Dr. Larry J. Pratt. SURGE addresses current climate trends through the lens of sea-level rise and the role that art and science play in creating a sustainable future. This performance took place during WHOI’s 2020 Ocean Encounters finale episode entitled Our Enchanted Ocean and was recorded on October 28, 2020.

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Exploring ocean sciences in graduate school

Are you considering graduate studies in ocean science/ocean engineering? Are you interested in STEM? You’ll hear from several graduate students on their experiences in the MIT-WHOI Joint Program. If you need advice about the application process or have a question about graduate student life, volunteer graduate students are here to help.

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Ocean Encounters: Sea Change

WHOI’s new president Peter De Menocal joins esteemed UN economics expert Jeffrey Sachs to explore the paths ahead for humanity and for life on Earth at a time of widespread environmental change

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Ocean Encounters: The Stories We Tell

Sea stories from ancient oral traditions to modern-day pirates. The ocean has been a source of inspiration throughout human history. Where did we come from? What’s over the horizon? How does our planet work? Join us to learn how different storytelling traditions have helped inform and enrich our knowledge about ourselves and our planet for generations.

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Rising Tides: preparing for the future

Like many coastal communities, Woods Hole, located on Cape Cod, faces an uncertain future. Rising sea level and the potential for increased frequency and intensity of storms present significant long-term threats. Woods Hole is home to world-leading marine science institutions performing critical research from shore-based facilities that enable access to the sea and yet, ironically, are vulnerable to the same climate change impacts that are the subject of study.

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Together For Science

It all starts with one drop, one insight, one eureka moment that can ripple across the planet. Every atom, particle, and molecule means we’re connected. Every step we take, every discovery we make, shapes our future. When faced with uncertain times, we turn to science for answers. And this is an uncertain time. Will our leaders rise to the challenge of climate change? Will we have the vision and the technical prowess to end hunger through sustainable fishing and farming of the ocean? Will rising seas consume our coastlines? Will understanding outpace industrialization in time to save coral reefs, right whales, and threatened ecosystems around the globe? For more than 90 years, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has been on call for our oceans. Driving discovery and providing the fundamental knowledge needed to respond to disasters, shape enlightened policies, and inspire individual action. It starts with one drop. One insight. One moment. Advancing together for uncertain times. Together for science. Together for our ocean, our planet, and our future.

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Ocean Encounters: Hurricanes

Coastal cities lie at the intersection of many issues—ocean and climate, ecosystems and human infrastructure, and a rapidly growing population on a constantly changing landscape between land and sea. Hurricanes present dramatic and often wholesale change that need multidisciplinary, collaborative solutions, that focus on supporting communities through uncertain times.

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Life on an Ocean World

One of the most enduring questions humans have been asking for millennia is, “Are we alone in the Universe?” Now, we may have the opportunity to answer that question within the lifetime of the current human generation.

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Ocean Encounters: Oceans Beyond Earth

Earth’s ocean is essential to life and may have even given rise to life on our planet billions of years ago. We now know that vast oceans of liquid water also exist beneath the icy shells of moons in our own solar system. These ocean worlds provide compelling targets in the search for extraterrestrial life, perhaps within the next human generation. Join us for a stimulating discussion of how the exploration of the depths of our ocean can help inform the search for life beyond Earth.

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The Underwater United States – virtual event recording

A virtual journey hosted by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean into the submarine canyons off the U.S. East Coast and how they play an important role in a healthy marine ecosystem in a critical part of U.S. territorial waters.

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One Small Step: From Life on the Seafloor to Life Beyond Earth

A team of WHOI researchers and colleagues use a decision-making robot to explore Kolumbo volcano—an ancient submarine volcano sitting 500 meters below the surface off Greece’s Santorini Island in the Aegean Sea. The expedition was part of a NASA-funded program that will attempt to answer a number of key questions: What can the organisms living in the extremes of this dark and chemical-laden underworld tell us about life on Earth and beyond?

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Ocean Encounters: Corals in Crisis

Worldwide, corals are struggling to survive, decimated by pollution, destructive fishing practices, and climate change. Six years ago, a deadly coral disease outbreak started in Florida and has now made its way to the coral reefs in U.S. Virgin Islands, killing corals at an unprecedented rate. Can scientists help stop this underwater epidemic and contain its spread?

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