Skip to content
For WHOI personnel, vendors, and visitors: COVID-19 Guidelines

What the difference is between climate and weather?

We often hear about the weather. We also hear about climate. The two terms are related. But they are not the same thing. What’s the difference? It’s a question of time. Weather takes place over short periods of time—hours, days, or weeks. Climate describes the weather over decades.

Both weather and climate describe events taking place in our atmosphere. Specifically, events affecting the lowest layer of the atmosphere, or troposphere. That’s the layer we interact with on a daily basis.

Climate and weather deal with temperature and precipitation. That’s a fancy word for water falling as rain, snow, hail, or sleet. Precipitation comes from clouds, so we also use terms like sunny, partly cloudy, or overcast to describe the weather. And the atmosphere is rarely still, making wind another important weather feature.

All aspects of weather ultimately come from sunlight. The sun heats the Earth unevenly. In tropical areas near the equator that receive the most sunlight, the surface warms quickly. That causes warm air to rise. Air from cooler regions rushes in to fill the space left behind, creating wind. Earth’s rotation plays a role in wind and weather patterns, too.

Heat also causes water to evaporate from rivers, lakes, and oceans. As more water enters the atmosphere, clouds form that may later drop precipitation. This often falls as a gentle rain or snow. Clouds over the ocean can eventually form storms. If these continue to build, they can become tropical storms or hurricanes. When they barrel onshore, they bring a deluge of rain and damaging winds. Over land, cold air colliding with warm air can also create strong winds and storms.

Weather can change very quickly, from minute to minute or hour to hour. Sometimes weather patterns last longer—for days, weeks, or even months. But weather patterns don’t last for years. Climate, on the other hand, tells us what weather patterns are like over decades.

Climate tells us what we can expect from the weather. Are winters typically cold and snowy? Are summers hot and humid? Does an area stay above freezing all year long? Does it receive almost no rain on a particular year? Such patterns describe the climate for a particular region. Scientists typically look at weather patterns over a 30-year period to get a sense of what is normal for the climate in a particular area.

When scientists look at weather records before the 1980s, they find that fairly consistent patterns occurred in different parts of the planet. But over the last 30 to 40 years, those patterns have been changing. Temperatures have been getting warmer. That’s especially true at night and in areas near the North and South Poles. Precipitation patterns are changing too. Some areas are getting more rain than they did in the past, often in the form of big storms. Other areas aren’t getting as much as they used to and are experiencing drought. It’s changes in those long-term patterns that tell us the climate is changing.

LEARN MORE ABOUT CLIMATE

Paleoclimatology

Earth’s climate has undergone many changes over the course of geologic history, but the past one million…

Read More
arctic sunburst over ice and water

Climate Change

The Effects of Global Warming – Facts about Climate Change | WHOI explores the warming of the atmosphere near the Earth’s surface.

Read More

Krajick, Kevin. James Hansen’s Climate Warning, 30 Years Later. State of the Planet, Columbia University. https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2018/06/26/james-hansens-climate-warning-30-years-later/ June 26, 2018.

NASA. What’s the Difference Between Weather and Climate? https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/noaa-n/climate/climate_weather.html February 1, 2005.

NOAA. What’s the Difference Between Weather and Climate? https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/weather-vs-climate  Accessed on January 7, 2021.

NOAA SciJinks. Why Does Wind Blow? https://scijinks.gov/wind/ Accessed on January 7, 2021.

DIVE INTO MORE OCEAN FACTS

Blue Ocean

Why is the ocean blue?

One idea is that it reflects the sky. But if we sink below the surface, the blue color remains. Here, the water isn’t reflecting the sky. So why is the ocean blue?

Find out more
variety of seashells

How are seashells made?

One of the most striking features of our beaches is seashells. Their whorls, curves, and shiny iridescent insides are the remains of animals. But where do they come from?

Find out more

Does the ocean produce oxygen?

It’s easy to think of the world’s forests as the planet’s “lungs.” Trees pump out oxygen—the same stuff we breathe in. But does all our breathable air come from just land?

Find out more
bioluminescence

How does bioluminescence work?

Deep in the ocean there’s very little sunlight. But if you could swim down there, it would look a bit like the night sky. Why is this?

Find out more