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Group Members

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Fiamma Straneo

Fiamma Straneo
Associate Scientist w/ Tenure
MS #21 Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
266 Woods Hole Rd., Woods Hole, MA 02543
Phone: (508) 289-2914
Email: fstraneo@whoi.edu

I am a physical oceanographer interested in the role of the ocean in climate. Most of my work has focused on the North Atlantic and Arctic high latitudes using a combination of field work, analysis of existing data, idealized models and theory.

Before a helicopter-based survey of Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland, August 2010. (Photo by D. Sutherland.)



Andree Ramsey

Andree Ramsey
Research Associate II (aramsey@whoi.edu)
Andree joined WHOI in 2009 and is in charge of processing, quality controlling and analysing much of the synoptic and moored data collected by the group (including ADCP, CTD and current meter data). She has a Masters in Geology and Geophysics from Boston College and worked for several years at USGS before joining WHOI.


Clark Richards

Clark Richards
Postdoctoral Investigator (crichards@whoi.edu)
Clark completed his PhD at Dalhousie University in Canada in 2012, working with Dan Kelley on internal waves and turbulence in the St. Lawrence Estuary. He came to WHOI in Fall 2012, where he is investigating the transformation of Atlantic waters in the Lofoten Basin of the Nordic Seas - an important component of the Meridional Overturning Circulation. Using two years of moored data from the Basin - he is examining the water mass transformation process and the effect of eddies. In addition, Clark has been studying waves excited by iceberg calving events in several Greenland fjords and their impact on the fjord circulation.

Ben Harden
Postdoctoral Scholar (bharden@whoi.edu)
Ben is a a high latitude oceanographer and meteorologist. He works mainly around Greenland and is particularly interested in the role that winds have in driving the circulation of vital currents along the coast. As part of this, he is involved in investigating how winds can drive warm waters into fjords and aid the melting of glacial tongues. He also works with Bob Pickart, to investigate the flow of Atlantic water around Iceland.


Nicholas Beaird
Postdoctoral Scholar (nbeaird@whoi.edu)
Nick is an oceanographer interested in the circulation and processes of the high latitude ocean. He recently finished his Ph.D. focusing on the flux of dense water from the Nordic Seas into the North Atlantic, a critical part of the oceanic overturning circulation. The field work was completed using slow moving but efficient underwater gliders, another interest of his. His current goal is to understand more about the fate of freshwater streaming off Greenland: can we measure how much? or where it goes? How does it interact with the circulation of the subpolar North Atlantic? He joined us in December 2013, after completing his Ph.D. at the University of Washington with C. Eriksen and P. Rhines.


Kenneth Mankoff
Postdoctoral Scholar (kmankoff@whoi.edu)
Ken studies ice sheet hydrology and ice-proximal oceanography using a combination of observational fieldwork, low-cost robotic vehicles, remote sensing and novel sensors and algorithms. His research spans the path of a drop of water from when it melts on the surface (or at the base) of the ice sheet, flows through and under the ice sheet, and eventually leaves the system exhausted into a Greenland fjord or under an Antarctic ice shelf. This freshwater flux is increasing in the warming climate. Downstream, the meltwater modifies fjord properties and coastal seas, changing oceanic and ice conditions. He joined our group in January 2014 after graduating from the University of Santa Cruz, where he worked with Slawek Tulaczyk.

Marilena Oltmanns

Marilena Oltmanns
Joint Program Student  (moltmanns@whoi.edu)
Marilena is a PhD student in the MIT/WHOI Joint Program. She comes from Germany where she completed a bachelor degree in Earth and Space Sciences at Jacobs University in Bremen. Her research focuses on katabatic winds blowing off the southeast Greenland ice sheet and their impact on the glaciers, the fjord circulation and sea-ice. To study these winds and their impact she is working on oceanographic data collected from the fjords, local meteorological data, reanalysis data and remote sensing data. She took part in the Sermilik Fjord 2010 expedition.



Mooring preparation, Sermilik Fjord, August 2010 (Photo F. Straneo)


Rebecca Jackson

Rebecca Jackson
Joint Program Student (rjackson@whoi.edu)
Becca joined the WHOI/MIT Joint Gradate program after completing a BSc in Physics at Yale University in 2010. Her current research focuses on investigating the circulation in Greenland's glacial fjords and, in particular, the combined glaciological and oceanographic forcings. She participated in the 2011 Sermilik Fjord Expedition.


Charting the position of a lost mooring , Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland 2011. (Photo F. Straneo)


Nat Wilson
Joint Program Graduate Student (nwilson@whoi.edu)
Nat is a graduate student studying glaciers and polar oceanography. While broadly interested in the cryosphere and polar regions, his current focus is on interactions and feedbacks between marine-terminating glaciers and the ocean. In the past, he has been involved in scientific work oriented around mountain glaciers in the Yukon Territory, ice-ocean interactions in the Canadian Arctic, and paleoglaciology in Patagonia. He joines us in September of 2013, after completing a Masters in Glaciology at Simon Fraser University with Gwenn Flowers.


James Holte

James Holte
Postdoctoral Investigator (jholte@whoi.edu)
Jamie obtained his PhD from Scripps, UCSD, working with Lynne Talley on Subantarctic Mode Waters and started working at WHOI in the fall of 2010. At WHOI, he studies oceanic processes which regulate the heat content of the upper ocean in the Southeast Tropical Pacific, a region of extensive stratocumulus formation which climate models typically get wrong. To investigate this region, Jamie is using ARGO, surface drifter, remote sensing, synoptic and moored data. In his spare time, he studies the interannual variability of the subpolar North Atlantic. At present, he is on paternity leave.



Last updated: January 23, 2014



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