Press Room

Ocean Acidification May Reduce Sea Scallop Fisheries

A new model predicts that Atlantic sea scallop fisheries may potentially be in danger.  As levels of carbon dioxide increase in the Earth’s atmosphere, the upper oceans become increasingly acidic—a condition that could reduce the sea scallop population by more than 50% in the next 30 to 80 years, under a worst-case scenario.  

Study Links Natural Climate Oscillations in North Atlantic to Greenland Ice Sheet Melt

Scientists have known for years that warming global climate is melting the Greenland Ice Sheet, the second largest ice sheet in the world. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, shows that the rate of melting might be temporarily increased or decreased by two existing climate patterns: the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO).

Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health Receives Five-year Funding from NSF and NIEHS

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), one of the National Institutes of Health, have announced that the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will receive funding to continue operating the Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health (WHCOHH).

Three WHOI Scientists to be Honored by AGU

WHOI scientists Caroline Ummenhofer and Chris Reddy will receive awards and Ray Schmitt will deliver the Harald Ulrik Sverdrup Lecture at the American Geophysical Union's annual fall meeting in December 2018.

$1 Million Grant to Build the WHOI-Keck Real Time 3-D Acoustic Telescope

A first-of-its-kind acoustic telescope is under development at the Woods HoleOceanographic Institution (WHOI), funded by a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation, that will permit researchers to map and study the underwater soundscape.

WHOI Chosen as Location of New NSF-funded Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Center

WHOI staff and technology will serve as central hub for research community working to understand the fundamental forces driving a range of natural hazards through new NSF-funded Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Center.

Study Finds Link Between River Outflow and Coastal Sea Level

Sea levels in coastal areas can be affected by a number of factors: tides, winds, waves, and even barometric pressure all play a role in the ebb and flow of the ocean. For the first time, however, a new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has shown that river outflow could play a role in sea level change as well.

Following the Fresh Water

A research team led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found the fingerprint of a massive flood of fresh water in the western Arctic, thought to be the cause of an ancient cold snap that began around 13,000 years ago.

Hearing Tests on Wild Whales

Scientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, AK, revealed that the whales have sensitive auditory systems and showed less age-related hearing loss than is expected.

Geologic History of Ayeyawady River Delta Mapped for the First Time

A team from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has collaborated with Myanmar scientists to present the first extensive view of the  Ayeyawady River delta’s history, revealing how its floodplains and shorelines on the Andaman Sea have grown and shrunk over the past 10,000 years.

Fueling a Deep-Sea Ecosystem

Miles beneath the ocean’s surface in the dark abyss, vast communities of subseafloor microbes at deep-sea hot springs are converting chemicals into energy that allows deep-sea life to survive—and even thrive—in a world without sunlight. Until now, however, measuring the productivity of subseafloor microbe communities—or how fast they oxidize chemicals and the amount of carbon they produce—has been nearly impossible.

New Details on Discovery of San Jose Shipwreck

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) recently obtained authorization by Maritime Archaeology Consultants, Switzerland AG (MAC), and the Colombian government to release new details from the successful search for the three-century old San José —a 62-gun, three-masted Spanish galleon ship that sank with a cargo believed to be worth billions of dollars. The ship, which is often called the “holy grail of shipwrecks,” went down with a treasure of gold, silver, and emeralds in 1708 during a battle with British ships in the War of Spanish Succession.

Are Emperor Penguins Eating Enough?

For Emperor penguins waddling around a warming Antarctic, diminishing sea ice means less fish to eat. How the diets of these tuxedoed birds will hold up in the face of climate change is a big question scientists are grappling with.

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