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The Science Party

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Carolina on Christmas Eve with CFC system in the background. (C. Grall)

Carolina Berys
CTD-Watch Stander (leg 1)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Hi, my name is Carolina. I work at Scripps Institution of Oceanography as a Programmer Analyst. I am a data manager for CCHDO and USHYDRO. I am aboard the Clivar P6 cruise to get a better understanding of the process that goes into collecting hydrographic data, to help out in any way I can, and maybe even have some fun and experience something new and interesting. This is my first time out to sea in the 2 years I have been with Scripps, where I started as a student intern. I am not quite sure what to expect, but I am excited to find out.

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Andy Bird
CTD watchstander (leg 2)

University of Rhode Island

I am a CTD watch stander (a good hooker). I am studying for a masters in ocean engineering at URI. I am originally from England, but live in RI now.

Random facts about Andy: Andy puts ketchup on everything, for example: eggs, rice, and pasta. Andy does flips all over the world. Andy talks like Charlie from LOST.



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Liz on the tagline. (A Macdonald)

Elizabeth Burakowski

University of New Hampshire



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Valentina sampling pH.

Valentina Gonzalez Caccia
Total Alkalinity and pH (leg 1)
University of Miami/RSMAS

Hi, I am Dr. Valentina Caccia: I am an oceanographer with a PhD in marine science specialized in trace metals. For the last 9 years, I have worked for the two largest universities in Miami (RSMAS, University of Miami and SERC, Florida International University) conducting environmental studies to evaluate the pollution that affects coastal and marine ecosystems in South Florida. My research has been focused on trace metals, nutrients and other water quality parameters. The ocean has been my passion since I was a little girl, therefore I use my free time to do marine education with a non profit organization in South Beach (ECOMB) and I always try to collaborate or be involved with diverse projects such as beach erosion, aquaculture and coral reef conservation. During my career, I have had the opportunity to participate in several oceanographic cruises, around the Caribbean, along the coast of Baja California Peninsula and the Sea of Cortez, but this is my first CLIVAR cruise and I am very excited to live this experience cruising along the South Pacific Ocean. This cruise was one of my wishes for 2009, and it has been an incredible experience since I am working with two very important parameters which are the clue for ocean acidification: pH and Alkalinity


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Drew Cole
Res Tech (Leg 2)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Drew is the res tech, the deck safety officer, and chooses to allow others to write his biography.  He is in charge of deployment and recovery of the rosette during the day shift.  He is the only fisherman to actually catch anything so far this trip (see picture).  He has a really big TV and an obsession with clown fish. He is also in charge of the word of the day and has declared veto power over words like "mango".

 



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Ruth Curry
Chief Scientist (Leg 2)

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

I am a Physical Oceanographer studying ocean circulation, water properties
and climate change -- and the Chief Scientist for leg 2.
I live on Cape Cod, Massachusetts and have been working at Woods Hole
Oceanographic Institution since 1980.
I am a mother (of a 17-year old son), runner, scuba diver, and I like to do
landscaping and vegetable gardening for fun.



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Thomas Decloedt
LADCP (leg 2)

University of Hawaii

My name is Thomas Decloedt. I recently finished a phd in physical oceanography at the University of Hawaii and now work as a postdoc for E. Firing at UH. I take care of the LADCP (Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) measurements on this leg of the P6 ClIVAR cruise. It is part of my job to curse the lack of zooplankton (scatterers necessary for good data) in the South Pacific. I am originally from Belgium and very fond of most sports involving boards.

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Liz Douglass
Co-chief Scientist (Leg 2)

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

My name is Liz Douglass.  I'm a postdoc in Physical Oceanography at Woods Hole, and co-chief scientist on this cruise.  Basically that means I'm a chief scientist in training, learning how to keep things running smoothly and adjust to ever-changing conditions.  This is the longest cruise I've ever been on, and so far it's a lot of fun!  In my spare time at home I like to run marathons (18 so far).  I have also worked on more Habitat for Humanity houses than I can count and have developed a strange love of roofing.


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Ryan Engle
Salts (Leg 2)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Hello, my name is Ryan and I recently graduated from University of California, San Diego with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering.  Currently I am employed by SIO, and on this cruise I am running salinity analysis, as well as helping with recoveries and deployments.  I spend my off time traveling, snowboarding and scuba diving.



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KG Fairborn
Optics (Leg 1 and 2)

UC Santa Barbara

My name is Kenneth George Fairbarn Jr but everyone calls me and knows me by "KG".  I graduated UC Santa Barbara June 2009 and am studying ocean optics on this cruise.  This is my second cruise and am on both legs of P6 (my own decision, and I still don't regret it).  Before flying to Australia for the first leg, I worked on the liveaboard dive boat "conception" as a deckhand therefore the last time that I spent more than a week on land was early September.  Obviously I like being at-sea, but when on land, I enjoy riding my bicycle.  I pedaled the coast  from Canada to Mexico before starting work as a deckhand on the dive boat.  I have an open schedule after this cruise and have spent most of my time at sea scheming the next adventure (most likely on a bike or boat).  Something random about me......hmmm, random describes me quite well.

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Sheila Griffin
DO14C (leg 2)

University of California, Irvine, Dept of Earth System Science

Few profiles are available for DO14C (dissolved organic carbon-14) in the northern hemisphere, and only one site is available in the southern hemisphere. DO14C values must be measured in most major ocean basins in order to get a better understanding of the timescale of DOC cycling in the ocean. This cruise will give us several sites in the South Pacific and thus a start in filling in these major data gaps.

As a volunteer Naturalist I give walking tours at Upper Newport Bay in Newport Beach , California

 



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Anna James
DOC (Leg 2)

Marine Science Institute

As a recent graduate from the Aquatic Biology program at the University of California at Santa Barbara, I sought to continue my interests in the field of marine biology as a lab technician. I currently work at the Marine Science Institute for the Carlson reasearch lab; this group focuses on the role of microorganisms in the exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the ocean and the impact this may have on the balance between oceanic and atmospheric CO2. My current adventures aboard the Melville have proved to be thoroughly enjoyable thanks to those aboard and the creativity that can be born of forty days at sea.

 



Laurie Juranek
DIC (Leg 2)

NOAA PMEL

Laurie is stowaway from NOAA PMEL in Seattle. She headed south in a never ending quest to find the mythical orb in the sky known as the sun. In the meantime she has been enlisted by the DIC army, and has taken camp in dangerous territory with the other van people, though she has thus far successfully avoided entrapment by the Helium gnome. Her ultimate plan is to collect enough DIC samples to distort the space time continuum and bring eternal summer back to Seattle. After that, world domination…



Carmen Hill-Lindsay
CFCs (Leg 2)

My name is Carmen Hill-Lindsay. I am a physical oceanographer interested in ocean mixing processes. My current topics of interest include internal waves, submesoscale eddies, frontogenesis, and island wakes. I completed my MS last month under the guidance of Jim McWilliams at UCLA. I am in the process of applying to graduate school for my PhD in Physical oceanography. On the Melville, I am processing CFC measurements. Currently, I enjoy sitting in a hot tub in the middle of the South Pacific ocean, smoking fine cigars, listening to music, surrounded by good company.



Pete's trailer

Pete Landry
Helium/Tritium (Leg 2)

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Subject: Peter B. Landry.

This man is the most dangerous man on the cruise. He is placed in solitary confinement for the protection of the rest of those on board. He is usually locked up in a protective container.

He has traveled throughout the world’s oceans and not without incident.

No one visits Pete for obvious reasons that should not be spoken out loud. The last time someone went in his container they were never seen again. 

He is let out occasionally under supervision. With multiple guards he is allowed to vent his pent up anger by hitting metal tubes with a wooden stick. He seems to get much pleasure from this activity.

He claims to work as an engineer for WHOI but they will not admit it. He has worked for many departments there, being discarded by one after another as he is too, shall we say, different.

His origins are hazy at best. It is said he was raised along the coast by a pair of seagulls and rumor has it that his mother was a hamster and his father reeked of elderberry but this is only rumor.

If you see this person, stay a safe distance away or he will take your helium forcibly with his stick.



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Alison taking sunrise photos. (Charlene Grall)

Alison Macdonald
Chief Scientist (Leg 1)

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, MA USA


I am a physical oceanographer and as chief scientist on this cruise it is my responsibility to organize the cruise; before (writing clearance requests, keeping lists of participants, making sure everybody knows how to get their equipment to the ship); during (coordinating - making sure everyone as the space and facilities they need to work, choosing station locations, keeping the science teams and the bridge informed, sending cruise reports back home); and after (writing the final cruise report and making sure the data has been sent to everyone it needs to go to) we sail. Basically, it is my job to make sure the science happens.  I am married, and at home I have three kids, three dogs, three cats, a rabbit and turtle. In my spare time I like to read, go for dog walks and play the bagpipes.

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Melissa Miller
Nutrients (Leg 2)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography


I am a chemist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and run the water samples we collect for nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, silicate and nitrite). I have always been interested in ocean science and last year volunteered on an SIO research cruise and immediately decided I needed to find a way to get paid to work at sea. This is my first trip as an employee, and my first time in the Southern hemisphere. I arrived in Tahiti 10 days before leg 2 departed and sampled island life, which included eating wonderful Polynesian food from the roulettes, swimming under a waterfall, and scuba diving with sharks, turtles and spinner dolphins.




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Jason (left), Stacy (center), and Giuseppe (right).

Team Millero: Jason Waters, Stacy Brown, and Giuseppe Manfredi
pH/Alkalinity (Leg 2)

RSMAS

Jason, Stacy, and Giuseppe are the members of Team Millero.  They are analyzing pH and alkalinity.  Their equipment has been attacked by gremlins and therefore they are unable to complete personal biographies at this time.  However, despite the fact that they haven't slept much this trip, they still seem to be in good humor (or perhaps just slightly delirious).



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Parisa Nahavandi
CTD (Leg 2)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

So my name is Parisa Nahavandi, I process CTD data, I'm from the San Diego area in CA, work for Scripps, and ironically I'm severely disgusted by live fish.



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Norm Nelson
CDOM (leg 2)

Earth Research Institute, UCSB


I study connections between ocean optics and the carbon cycle. Right now I'm studying the global distribution and dynamics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter.   I'm from the South San Francisco Bay Area. Campbell, to be precise; where the canning of fruit in metal tins was invented. FACT. My wife, my two older kids, and I, all attended (or currently attend) UC Santa Cruz.

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Rob Palomares
Deck Leader/Salts (Legs 1 and 2)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Rob is the night shift deck leader, and is apparently morally opposed to writing his own biography.  He is our deck leader on the night shift, in charge of deployment and recovery of the rosette.  He has an excellent collection of music, a bizarre love of bad poetry, and a tendency to sing the lumberjack song during CTD recovery.  He's also our resident "naval surgeon", which means if you have a botfly in your finger, he'll deal with it.


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Angie Pendergrass
CTD watchstander (leg 2)

University of Washington

Where am I from?  University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Sciences

What am I doing on the ship? (1) Participating in observational science. (2) Learning about the ocean.

Angie's random fact: "I love clouds, and Lost is my life!"

(editor's note: "Lost" refers to the TV show...I think)




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Alex Quintero
Oxygen (Leg 2)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

My name is Alejandro (Alex) Quintero.  I'm a research associate at Scripps Institution of Oceanography.  On this cruise I am analyzing dissolved oxygen concentration and am helping deploy/recover the rosette as a member of the deck crew. This being my first cruise, I'm learning a lot and having a blast. 

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Wendi Ruef
CFCs (Leg 2)

University of Washington

Wendi Ruef is an oceanographer at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is working with Mark Warner analyzing water samples for CFCs. She believes that every time fruit and chocolate combine the world is one precarious step closer to implosion; she sometimes forgets objects don't have feelings and apologizes to the door for slamming it; she secretly hopes that exposure to concentrated CFCs on this cruise will help her develop super powers.



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Kristin Sanborn
CTD/Hydrographic Support team supervisor (Leg 2)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

On this expedition, I supervise the Shipboard Technical Support/Oceanographic Data Facility, (STS/ODF), CTD/Hydrographic team. The team of 8 technicians provides and analyzes CTD data (pressure, temperature, conductivity/salinity, and oxygen). Salinity and oxygen are also drawn from the bottles, along with nutrients (phosphate, silicate, nitrate and nitrite). We also provide 2 Electronic Technicians who not only support our data analysis, but also maintain the CTD and bottles. Our group merges the bottle data from the rest of the science party and provide the Data Center, CCHDO, with these data along with an inventory of all samples drawn.

The included picture was taken at my Godson's, Jesse, wedding. My husband, Ted and I, are in my sister's 1937 Ford Roadster. The picture was chosen by my 12 year old Grandson, Colbe. Colbe will be 13 in March, 2010 and we love each other dearly. We are going to make fudge when I get home.

I have sailed in the Arctic and Antarctic as well as the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Although some of the people that were in our department have been on the North Pole, none of the expeditions I was on had the priviledge of that experience. I do have a lot of pictures, though.



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Rob Thombley
Electronics Technician/Oxygen (Leg 2)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Robert Lee Thombley IV - Electronics Technician at SIO.  Before that Research Assistant for CalCOFI program.  Before that Engineering student at UCSD.  Before that, high school. Before that, childhood.  Before that, well, let's stop here.

Places I've been on a boat - Hawaii, Alaska, South Africa, Australia, Tahiti, up and down the West Coast. Places I'd like to go on a boat - Everywhere except those places listed above.

What I'm doing after I get off of this boat - wine and wearing different clothes.



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Hannah and Atlas

Hannah Traggis
CTD watchstander (leg 2)

University of New Hampshire


I am a Master's degree candidate at the University of New Hampshire studying plant physiology. Specifically, I am investigating the physiological and biochemical effects of Iron deficiency on the photosynthetic apparatus of several oceanic phytoplankton taxa. With a B.S. in Marine Biology, I intend to pursue a PhD in Biological Oceanography. One of my greatest joys, my dog Atlas, passed out of my life this fall but I continue to greatly enjoy caring for my animals. Gardening of all kinds (herb, veggie, landscape) occupies much of my free time when the snow melts!



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Mark Warner
CFCs (Leg 2)

University of Washington, School of Oceanography

Mark is out on this cruise to measure the anthropogenic tracers, CFC-11, CFC-12, and SF6, dissolved in the water column. He has also run and had a beer on every continent.



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Sam Wilson
CTD watchstander (leg 2)
Sam Wilson graduated from UCLA last June with a degree in Math/Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, and is currently applying to various institutions for graduate studies in Physical Oceanography. He is currently acting as a CTD Watch-stander, before spending four months backpacking around South America. Sam is a Gemini and enjoys cooking and mid-length walks on the beach.



Last updated: February 7, 2010
 


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