Please note: You are viewing the unstyled version of this website. Either your browser does not support CSS (cascading style sheets) or it has been disabled. Skip navigation.

Press Releases, Media Briefings

  Email    Print  PDF  Change text to small (default) Change text to medium Change text to large

NOAA News Release
NCCOS Funded-Partner Demonstrate Sustained Offshore HAB Observation Capabilities in Gulf of Maine

NOAA Awards Emergency Funding to Aid New England Red Tide Response
July 23, 2009

Prediction, Response, and Status of New England Red Tide 2009
April 22, 2009

NOAA Establishes New England Red Tide Site to Aid Public and News Media
May 19, 2008


WHOI News Releases
esp illustrationMay 7, 2013
New Robotic Instruments to Provide Real-Time Data on Gulf of Maine Red Tide

A new robotic sensor deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Gulf of Maine coastal waters may transform the way red tides or harmful algal blooms (HABs) are monitored and managed in New England. A second such instrument will be launched later this spring.


Source: Media Relations

bushel of clamsApril 10, 2013
Research Enables Fishermen to Harvest Lucrative Shellfish on Georges Bank
New scientific understanding of toxic algal blooms on Georges Bank, along with an at-sea and dockside testing protocol, has allowed fishermen to harvest ocean quahogs and surf clams in these offshore waters for the first time in more than two decades. The Georges Bank surf clam and ocean quahog fishery has an estimated annual value of $10 – 15 million.
Source: Media Relations

shellfish closure signMarch 25, 2013
Researchers Issue Forecast for 'Moderate' New England Red Tide in 2013

New England is expected to experience a “moderate” red tide this spring and summer, report NOAA-funded scientists studying the toxic algae that cause blooms in the Gulf of Maine. Red tide is caused by an alga Alexandrium fundyense, which produces a toxin that can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP).  Red tide occurs annually along some portions of the Gulf of Maine coast.  This outlook is similar to the 2012 red tide which was moderate. 


Source: Media Relations

algae cystsApril 4, 2012
Researchers Report Potential for a "Moderate" New England "Red Tide" in 2012

New England is expected to experience a “moderate” regional “red tide” this spring and summer, report NOAA-funded scientists working in the Gulf of Maine to study the toxic algae that causes the bloom. The algae in the water pose no direct threat to human beings, however the toxins they produce can accumulate in filter-feeding organisms such as mussels and clams — which can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans who consume them.


Source: Media Relations

April 8, 2011
Researchers Report Potential for a Moderate New England 'Red Tide' in 2011
Scientists from the NOAA-funded Gulf of Maine Toxicity (GOMTOX) project issued an outlook for a moderate regional bloom of a toxic alga that can cause ‘red tides’ in the spring and summer of this year, potentially threatening the New England shellfish industry. However, there are signs this year’s bloom could be suppressed by recent changes in ocean conditions in the Gulf of Maine.
Source: Media Relations

February 24, 2010
Researchers Issue Outlook for a Significant New England 'Red Tide' in 2010
Today, scientists from the NOAA-funded Gulf of Maine Toxicity (GOMTOX) project issued an outlook for a significant regional bloom of a toxic alga that can cause ‘red tides’ in the spring and summer of this year, potentially threatening the New England shellfish industry. This year’s bloom could be similar to the major red tides of 2005 and 2008, according to WHOI biologist Don Anderson, principal investigator of the GOMTOX study.
Source: Media Relations

April 22, 2009
Researchers Report Potential for "Moderately Large" Red Tide Outbreak in the Gulf of Maine Region for 2009
The potential for an outbreak of the phenomenon commonly called “red tide” is expected to be “moderately large” this spring and summer, according to researchers with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and North Carolina State University.
Source: Media Relations

 In Computer Models and Seafloor Observations, Researchers See Potential for Significant 2008 April 24, 2008
Researchers See Potential for Significant 2008 "Red Tide" Season
Researchers from WHOI and North Carolina State University are preparing for a potentially big bloom of harmful algae in New England waters this spring. A combination of abundant beds of algal seeds and excess winter precipitation have set the stage for an Alexandrium bloom similar to the historic “red tide” of 2005. Weather patterns and ocean conditions over the next few months will determine whether this year’s algal growth affects coastal shellfishing.
Source: Media Relations

October 16, 2006
Harmful Algal Bloom (Red Tide) Models and Forecasts to be Expanded in Gulf of Maine
A new observation and modeling program focused on the southern Gulf of Maine and adjacent New England shelf waters could aid policymakers in deciding whether or not to re-open, develop, and manage offshore shellfish beds with potential sustained harvesting value of more than $50 million per year.
Source: Media Relations

red tide cystApril 13, 2006
New Maps Provide Clues to the Historic 2005 Red Tide Outbreak in New England And Hints for 2006
WHOI scientists  have completed two extensive survey and mapping efforts to better understand why the 2005 New England red tide was so severe and to suggest what might lie ahead.
Source: Media Relations

redtide_monitor_x.jpgMay 26, 2005
WHOI Scientists Monitor Largest Red Tide Outbreak in 12 Years in Massachusetts Bay
Faced with a "perfect storm" of red tide, WHOI scientists share data quickly with public health officials
Source: Media Relations

2005 New England Red Tide Media Briefings July 14 July 12, 2005
2005 New England Red Tide Media Briefings July 14
Source: Media Relations



Last updated: July 7, 2014
 


whoi logo

Copyright ©2007 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, All Rights Reserved, Privacy Policy.
Problems or questions about the site, please contact webdev@whoi.edu