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Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Anders Carlson

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Projects
» Ice Sheet Response to Climate

» North Atlantic Surface Salinity

» Till Rheology

» Holocene Climate Change


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This is a graph showing the relationship between carbon dioxide concentration and sea level (ice sheet volume) relative to modern.


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This figure shows the area of the LIS, relative sea level and insolation forcing


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This figure shows the timing of LIS deglaciation, insolation forcing, relative sea level, and planktonic oxygen isotope record from the Labrador Sea


Response Time of Ice Sheets to Climatic Forcing

Collaborators:
Joe Stoner (COAS, Oregon State University), Jeff Donnelly (WHOI) Grad Students Involved; Brent Goehring (LDEO), Helen Evans (U. of Florida)

This is an on-going project (multiple) investigating the response of Northern Hemisphere Ice Sheets to climate forcing (e.g. carbon dioxide, insolation). The over arching goal is to determine how fast an ice sheet will retreat to predict the response of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets to global warming. For instance, the current carbon dioxide level (Fig. 1) has condemned us to ~20 or so meters of sea level rise (no Greenland or West Antarctic Ice Sheets). What we don't know is how fast that will happen. Current ice sheet models are incapable of simulating past rapid ice sheet retreat and are failing to predict the current acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Thus, I am circumventing the short-comings of models by using the geologic record (where there are collapses of ice sheets) to better constrain the sensitivity of ice sheets to climate perturbations (Fig. 2). Another aspect of this research is looking at the climatic effects that occur when an ice sheet is removed. I am currently using terrestrial records (e.g. Cosmogenic Isotope dating) from the Laurentide Ice Sheet which are indicating that this ice sheet experienced several collapses in the mid-Holocene (Fig. 2 & 3). I have projects in the works to continue studying the Laurentide Ice Sheet along with the othern Northern Hemisphere ice sheets using terrestrial and marine records.

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