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FREE event: WHOI's Oceans Science Café

Wednesday, February 28, 2018 • 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Falmouth Cinema Pub in Falmouth, MA

May 2017
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
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 12:00 PM Novel Insights into Harmful Algal Bloom Ecology Through Deployments of Robotic In Situ Biosensors8:00 AM Diving First Aid for the Professional Diver8:00 AM Diving First Aid for the Professional Diver12:00 PM There will be no Biology Department seminar today12:00 PM There will be no seminars today
 2:00 PM Trace Element Proxies and Mineral Indicators of Hydrothermal Fluid pH and Metal Content and Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposit Formation Processes10:00 AM Oceanic Turbulence and Highly Intermittent Plankton Ecosystem
 12:15 PM Linking Organic Matter Chemistry to Its Degradation by Sunlight in Aquatic Ecosystems
 1:30 PM Transition from a Continental to an Oceanic Rift in the Northern Red Sea
 3:05 PM Dimensions of Continents and Oceans - Water Has Carved a Perfect Cistern
 
 
 
 
 
7  8  9  10  11  12  13  
12:15 PM Organic Matter Sulfurization and the Carbon Cycle12:15 PM There will be no MC&G Department seminar today12:00 PM Investigation of Ocean Sunfish, Mola Mola, that Strand on the Shores of Cape Cod, MA12:15 PM Collective Phenomena in Living Matter -- A Case Study on Emperor Penguins 1:30 PM Alexandrium catanella Cyst Dynamics in a Coastal Embayment: Temperature Dependence of Dormancy, Germination, and Bloom Initiation
1:30 PM Pito Deep - Revisiting Pacific Lower Crust, the 3rd Dimension of Magnetic Stripes & Long, Lost Hydrothermal Vents12:15 PM Direct Measurement of Momentum, Heat and Mass Fluxes and Their Use in Marine Boundary Layer Studies
3:05 PM Air-Sea Interaction, Water Mass Formation and Ocean Circulation -- From Warm-Salty (Red Sea) to Cold-Fresh Waters (Southern Ocean)
14  15  16  17  18  19  20  
12:00 PM There will be no seminars today12:15 PM Mantle Volatile Signatures from the East African Rift and the Origin of Economically-Viable Helium-Rich Seeps12:15 PM There will be no AOP&E Department seminar today12:00 PM Avenues of Coral Acclimatization in Response to Rapid Environmental Change12:00 PM There will be no seminars today
3:05 PM New Views of the Gulf Stream
21  22  23  24  25  26  27  
12:00 PM There will be no seminars today12:15 PM There will be no MC&G Department seminar today12:15 PM Land-Sea Water Exchange from Ripples to Shelves: Implications for Chemical Inputs to the Coastal Ocean3:30 PM Influence of Dispersal Processes on the Global Dynamics of the Emperor Penguin, a Species Threatened by Climate Change12:00 PM There will be no seminars today
3:05 PM Production, Export, and Oceanic Impacts of Greenland's Glacial Meltwater3:30 PM Mesozooplankton Are Not Herbivores: The Importance of Microzooplankton in Mesozooplankton Diets
28  29  30  31           
12:00 PM Memorial Day Holiday (Institution closed)12:00 PM Dante's 9th Circle of Hell Is Ice (A Fact that Is Not Unrelated to the Study of Light and Algae in Polar Ocean Ecosystems)12:15 PM Is the Universe Stringy, Loopy, or Just an Entangled Mess?
12:15 PM How Do We Detect Life that Turns over More Slowly than the Ocean? Geochemical Methods to Study the Deep Subsurface
3:05 PM The Generation of Rossby Waves and Wake Eddies by Small Islands

Other Events and Notes of Interest

PEANUT BUTTER CLUB: February 23

Celebrates Black History Month with the PBS video “Roads to Memphis” on Friday, February 23, at noon, in Redfield Auditorium, 45 Water St., Woods Hole. On April 4, 1968, James Earl Ray shot and killed Dr. Martin Luther King. This is the fateful narrative of the killer and his prey, set against the seething, turbulent forces in American society. Sponsored by the Information Office. Coffee, tea, and cookies served. Donations accepted.

PEANUT BUTTER CLUB: March 2

Presents the video “The Secret of Tuxedo Park” on Friday, February 16, at noon, in Redfield Auditorium, 45 Water St., Woods Hole. Using his connections, his money, and his brilliant scientific mind, Alfred Lee Loomis, a mysterious Wall Street tycoon and his team of scientists developed radar technology that would arguably play a more decisive role than any other weapon in the war. The “Secret of Tuxedo Park” tells a long-overlooked story of an individual who helped alter the course of history in World War II. Sponsored by the Information Office. Coffee, tea, and cookies served. Donations accepted.

THE WOODS HOLE FOLK MUSIC SOCIETY (WHFMS): February 25

Presents “Windborne” on Sunday, February 25. “Windborne” is a quartet of young vocalists specializing in close harmony singing from many lands, performing a cappella and accompanied by traditional instruments such as banjo, jaw harp, and washboard. While rooted in American traditions, they shift effortlessly between vastly different vocal cultures, including some from countries in which they have performed: the Republic of Georgia, Corsica, Bulgaria, Spain, Québec, and beyond. Their debut album "Song on the Times," featuring Anglo-American music of the working classes, was released in 2016 to international acclaim. Praised for "the purity of their voices, strength of their material, and attention to detail in their arrangements," Lynn Mahoney Rowan, Will Thomas Rowan, Lauren Bruenig, and Jeremy Carter-Gordon share a vibrant energy onstage. Their connection to each other and to the music is evident as they educate while entertaining, telling stories and explaining the stylistic elements of the traditions in which they sing. Travel the world through uplifting song! The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 7:00 p.m. Admission is $20, $17 for members – with discounts for, seniors, youth, and children. The Community Hall is handicapped accessible. There is no charge for street parking after 6:00 p.m. More information is available at www.arts-cape.com/whfolkmusic or by calling (508) 540-0320.

WOODS HOLE FILM FESTIVAL (WHFF)

Presents “Dinner & A Movie” screening series. “Dinner & A Movie” is a monthly series of independent films presented by the WHFF at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Redfield Auditorium located at 45 Water Street, Woods Hole. The selections include films from the 26th Woods Hole Film Festival, as well as films curated specifically for the series. The series is part of the WHFF’S year-round independent film program. Tickets are $14 per person, $12, for WHFF members, $10 for students and veterans, and are on sale in advance at www.woodsholefilmfestival.org or at the door at Redfield Auditorium. The screening starts at 7:30 p.m., and doors open at 7:00 p.m. On the night of each screening, ticket purchasers may present their e-tickets for discounts and special offers at various restaurants. Participating restaurants include: The Captain Kidd, 77 Water Street, Woods Hole; Quick’s Hole Tavern, 29 Railroad Avenue, Woods Hole; Water Street Kitchen and Public House, 56 Water Street, Woods Hole; and the Woods Hole Market, 86 Water Street, Woods Hole. The restaurant purchase is separate from the film ticket. Contact the restaurant directly for reservations or information.

WOODS HOLE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Week of February 19

The library is beginning a new season of “Knitting at the Library.” This event takes place twice a month, on the first and third Thursdays, from 4:30 - 6:30 p.m., throughout the winter. Rather than a class, this is a group of people who like to knit. However, all skill levels are welcome. People will be happy to interrupt their own projects to coach others. It is a nurturing environment, in the time-honored manner of neighborliness and encouragement. New participants are welcome to stop in and “try it out.” The library will begin a new series of craft workshops for children called “Crafternoons,” on all Saturday afternoons at 2:00 p.m., through the winter. All of the sessions are free, and there will be no charge for materials. All the crafts will be easy enough for young children to do, though attractive enough that children up to age 10 will enjoy making them. As an additional attraction, knitting will always be available for the children, with instructors on hand. A new book group is forming at the library. This group will spend five-months discussing the newest translation of The Odyssey. The discussions will be led by Librarian Kellie Porter. She plans to break the book up into sections, stopping to compare translations of key passages along the way. Various well-respected translations will be read and compared, including Fagles and Fitzgerald, among others. The group will meet on the last Thursday of the month, January-May at 4:00 p.m. Thanks to a grant from the Falmouth Road Race, the library is again offering winter yoga classes for children. Ms. Chelsea Doohan will teach these classes on Saturday afternoons starting February 24 running for six weeks. Children aged nine and under will meet at 1 p.m.; those aged 10 and up, will meet at 4 p.m. Chelsea, a life-long library patron, graduated from Oberlin College in Ohio. Since graduation, she has gone on to study “Simple Yoga” at a studio in Oberlin, Ohio. During the last several years, she has been teaching yoga in the Falmouth area, returning occasionally to the Oberlin studio to train future yoga instructors. She is delighted to be offering classes at the library again as she has for the past few winters. She loves working with children, and welcomes parents to attend. She looks forward to the more focused classes made possible by splitting the age groups. Thanks to the grant, this series of classes will be free and open to the public. For more information and to register, call the library at (508) 548-8961 or visit https://woodsholepubliclibrary.org/.

WOODS HOLE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Week of February 26

The library is beginning a new season of “Knitting at the Library.” This event takes place twice a month, on the first and third Thursdays, from 4:30 - 6:30 p.m., throughout the winter. Rather than a class, this is a group of people who like to knit. However, all skill levels are welcome. People will be happy to interrupt their own projects to coach others. It is a nurturing environment, in the time-honored manner of neighborliness and encouragement. New participants are welcome to stop in and “try it out.” The library will begin a new series of craft workshops for children called “Crafternoons,” on all Saturday afternoons at 2 p.m., through the winter. All of the sessions are free, and there will be no charge for materials. All the crafts will be easy enough for young children to do, though attractive enough that children up to age 10 will enjoy making them. As an additional attraction, knitting will always be available for the children, with instructors on hand. Thanks to a grant from the Falmouth Road Race, the library is again offering winter yoga classes for children. Ms. Chelsea Doohan will teach these classes on Saturday afternoons running for six weeks. Children aged nine and under will meet at 1 p.m.; those aged 10 and up, will meet at 4 p.m. She loves working with children, and welcomes parents to attend. She looks forward to the more focused classes made possible by splitting the age groups. Thanks to the grant, this series of classes will be free and open to the public. The library will offer its next “Winter Craft Workshop” on Thursday, March 1, at 7 p.m. Anne Richards, beekeeper, marine biologist, and library board member will lead a session on making BeeswaxWraps. These “wraps” are an eco-friendly alternative to plastic wrap. They are made with local beeswax, cotton fabric, pine resin, and jojoba oil and can be used to wrap a sandwich, hunk of cheese, fruit, or to cover your dishes. In this workshop, each participant will make a set of three wrappers of different sizes. Materials will be provided. The instruction for the class is free; there will be a small materials charge. There is a maximum number of 10 people for each class, so call the library at (508) 548-8961 to reserve a spot. The next travel talk will be held at the library on March 3 at 3 p.m., and will feature Terry Rioux, retired dive officer at WHOI, recounting a recent trip to the Panama Canal. Terry and his wife Maggie, also retired from WHOI, went to Panama with Road Scholar and learned many interesting facts about the Canal, some of which Terry will share with the audience. He will also show his stunning photographs, taken as they traveled across the country, twice, first on the railroad, which was built originally in 1850, and then by boat as they locked through the canal. Admission is free and open to the public. For more information, call the library at (508) 548-8961 or visit https://woodsholepubliclibrary.org/.

WOODS HOLE BLACK HISTORY MONTH: February 22

On Thursday, February 22, clips from the new documentary film “The Vietnam War” followed by a panel session will commence at 2:00 p.m., in the MBL’s Speck Auditorium in the Rowe Laboratory at the corner of Water and MBL Streets in Woods Hole. “The Vietnam War” is a new 10-part, 18-hour documentary film series by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick which aired on PBS nationwide in the fall of 2017.  Six years in the making, the film features testimony from nearly 100 witnesses, including many Americans who fought in the war and others who opposed it, as well as Vietnamese combatants and civilians from both the winning and losing sides. The panel session to follow will provide perspectives from African Americans who served in the Vietnam War, including one of those featured in the film, as they explore the complex meanings and implications of the international struggle and its aftermath. Panelists include Ron Armstead, Roger Harris, Larry Johnson, Clifton Reed, and Ervin Russell. Harambee, an annual ethnic potluck feast celebrating everyone of every race, will take place starting at 4:30 p.m., in the Main Dining Hall of the MBL’s Swope Center. Entertainment will be provided by the Cape Cod African Dance and Drum, an ensemble of dancers and drummers who practice traditional West African and Afro-Caribbean dance and drumming on Cape Cod and the New England area.  Former Woods Hole Black History Month Chair Lionel Hall will serve as DJ for the Harambee, which ends at 7:30 p.m. Woods Hole Black History Month events are sponsored by the Marine Biological Laboratory, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center), Sea Education Association, U.S. Geological Survey Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center, Woods Hole Research Center, and WHOI.

THE WOODS HOLE FOLK MUSIC SOCIETY (WHFMS): March 11

Presents “Claudia Schmidt & Sally Rogers” on Sunday, March 11. A dream team, particularly for dulcimer fans! Claudia Schmidt is a self-described "creative noisemaker," delighting audiences with everything from folk classics to poetry, bawdy verse, torch songs, hymns, satire, and multifaceted originals. Her astonishing vocal range is complemented by 12-string guitar and mountain dulcimer. Claudia has been featured on stages large and small for four decades, and her folk and jazz-based compositions have found their way into radio, TV, film, and theater productions. Sally Rogers sings traditional and original songs and plays guitar, banjo and mountain dulcimer. United by a sense of social justice and humanity, these two strong women of the folk world have kindled a deep friendship over the years, and their duo albums have become beloved classics. Don't miss this chance to hear them live together. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Admission is $20, $17 for members – with discounts for, seniors, youth, and children. The Community Hall is handicapped accessible. There is no charge for street parking after 6 p.m. More information is available at www.arts-cape.com/whfolkmusic or by calling (508) 540-0320.

WHOI OCEAN SCIENCE EXHIBIT CENTER & GIFTSHOP

Located at 15 School Street, Woods Hole, is closed for the season and will re-open in mid-April.  For more information, call (508) 289-2663. WHOI merchandise is available year-round by visiting our online store at http://shop.whoi.edu/.