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Acoustics


Warping Sound in the Ocean

Warping Sound in the Ocean

WHOI scientists warp sound–the primary means of transmitting information in the ocean–to “see” what’s happening below the surface.

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How Do Fish Find Their Way?

How Do Fish Find Their Way?

An MIT-WHOI Joint Program graduate student is exploring how tiny larvae hatched in the open ocean find their way to coral reefs where they settle down and live.

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Eavesdropping on Whales

Eavesdropping on Whales

WHOI scientist Mark Baumgartner has installed a mooring in New York waters that listens for whales and sends back alerts. The prototype advance-warning system could one day help reduce shipping collisions with whales.

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Communicating Under Sea Ice

Communicating Under Sea Ice

Researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution developed a new communication and navigation system that works over long distances under Arctic sea ice, allowing scientists to use autonomous underwater vehicles to explore the ice-covered Arctic Ocean.

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The Man Who Opened Our Ears to the Ocean

The Man Who Opened Our Ears to the Ocean

Over his long career at WHOI, Bill Watkins pioneered new instruments to collect sounds of whales, dolphins, and other marine mammals. That treasure trove will now be archive in the New Bedford Whaling Museum.

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