Shellfish


Securing the Supply of Sea Scallops for Today and Tomorrow

Good management has brought the $559 million United States sea scallop fishery back from the brink of collapse over the past 20 years.  However, its current fishery management plan does not account for longer-term environmental change like ocean warming and acidification that may affect the fishery in the future. A group of researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service, and Ocean Conservancy hope to change that. 

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On the Trail of an Invader

On the Trail of an Invader

To find out when and how fast a small gray barnacle came to New England waters, WHOI researchers turn to forensic techniques.

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Scallops Under Stress

Scallops Under Stress

Like other marine species, scallops face multiple climate change-related problems. Summer Student Fellow Cailan Sugano studied how scallops respond to acidification and lack of food—and whether extra food can help them resist damage due to more acidic seawater.

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Sassy Scallops

Sassy Scallops

MIT-WHOI Joint Program graduate student Meredith White examined how increasingly acidic ocean waters affect scallop shells in their critical early stages of development.

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A Scallop’s Life

A Scallop's Life

Suspended in the water, floating in unseen hordes, shellfish larvae are transported by wind and tidal currents until they settle…

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Yeti Crab

Many crab species live at hydrothermal vents, scavenging and eating other organisms. In 2005 scientists in Alvin (the shadow you…

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