Ocean Life


Diverse Corals Persist, But Bioerosion Escalates in Palau’s Low-pH Waters

As the ocean absorbs atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) released by the burning of fossil fuels, its chemistry is changing. The CO2 reacts with water molecules, lowering ocean pH in a process known as ocean acidification. This process also removes carbonate ions, an essential ingredient needed by corals and other organisms to build their skeletons and shells.

Read More

Living Laboratory

Living Laboratory

The colors in coral come from symbiotic algae cells living inside individual corals organisms, or polyps. This  “bleached” coral has expelled much…

Read More

Royal Pain

Royal Pain

Gliding on hundreds of tiny suction-cup feet, a crown-of-thorns sea star roams the reef, consuming immobile corals and leaving bare…

Read More

Bit O’ Coral

Bit O' Coral

They look like pancakes, but they are actually bits of living coral called “nubbins” with a green band of algae…

Read More

Securing the Supply of Sea Scallops for Today and Tomorrow

Good management has brought the $559 million United States sea scallop fishery back from the brink of collapse over the past 20 years.  However, its current fishery management plan does not account for longer-term environmental change like ocean warming and acidification that may affect the fishery in the future. A group of researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service, and Ocean Conservancy hope to change that. 

Read More