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Ocean Life


An Ear in the Ocean

An Ear in the Ocean

WHOI research engineer Rod Catanach wires a sound recorder on a coral reef off St. John in the U.S. Virgin…

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Reef Research

Reef Research

Kan-Min of the Dongsha Atoll Research Station steers a research vessel over Dongsha’s coral reef in the South China Sea,…

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Corals Under Threat

Corals Under Threat

A large school of bigeye trevally swim past a submarine carrying WHOI scientists descending in Cabu Pulmo National Park, home…

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Coral Skeleton Crystals

Coral Skeleton Crystals

Former MIT-WHOI Joint Program student Tom DeCarlo holds a vial containing aragonite, a crystal form of calcium carbonate, the mineral…

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Feeling the Heat in the NW Atlantic

Feeling the Heat in the NW Atlantic

Rising temperatures along the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean will force American lobsters (H. americanus) farther offshore and into more northern waters, according to a new study led by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

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Heidi Sosik Selected as a Fellow of The Oceanography Society

Heidi Sosik Selected as a Fellow of The Oceanography Society

Heidi Sosik, a senior scientist in the Biology Department at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has been named a 2018 Fellow of The Oceanography Society (TOS). Sosik’s accomplishments will be formally recognized on Feb. 13, 2018, during a ceremony at the 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting in Portland, Oregon.

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Homing in on Reef Homes

Homing in on Reef Homes

Justin Suca holds a translucent young mantis shrimp off the Caribbean island of St. John where he does field work.…

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Bleached Coral

Bleached Coral

A coral at Dongsha Atoll in the South China Sea shows the effects of “bleaching.” The phenomenon occurs when ocean temperatures…

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Tiny Jellyfish with a Big Sting

Tiny Jellyfish with a Big Sting

Clinging jellyfish in waters near Vladivostok, Russia, are known for their painful, toxic stings. In the U.S., where clinging jellies had been relatively harmless, a new, venomous variety has recently appeared on Cape Cod, Mass., and in nearby regions. WHOI biologist Annette Govindarajan is using genetic techniques to trace their geographic origins.

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Snap Chatter

Snap Chatter

Snapping shrimp usually look something like tiny lobsters, with one front claw much larger than the other. They use their…

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