Ocean Life


Coated Corals

Coated Corals

In 2010, Alvin traveled to the Gulf of Mexico to assess the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on vulnerable deep-sea corals ecosystems and the…

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Minerals Made by Microbes

Minerals Made by Microbes

Some minerals actually don’t form without a little help from microscopic organisms, using chemical processes that scientists are only beginning to reveal.

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Vulnerable Corals

Vulnerable Corals

Researchers in Anne Cohen‘s lab are investigating how changes in the ocean, caused by climate change, may threaten coral reefs.…

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A Mighty Mysterious Molecule

A Mighty Mysterious Molecule

What gives sea air its distinctive scent? A chemical compound called dimethylsulfide. In a new study, WHOI scientists show that the compound may also be used by marine microbes to communicate with one another.

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Recipes for Antibiotic Resistance

Recipes for Antibiotic Resistance

MIT-WHOI graduate student Megan May is investigating how microbes naturally develop resistance to antibiotic compounds in the marine environment and how human activities, including overuse of drugs and pollution, may be affecting the dynamic.

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HABCAM

HABCAM

A towed underwater vehicle equipped with cameras, sonar, and sensors paints vivid portraits of life on the seafloor.

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Robotic Vehicles Offer a New Tool in Study of Shark Behavior

Robotic Vehicles Offer a New Tool in Study of Shark Behavior

The dramatic video footage of a great white shark attacking the “REMUS SharkCam” autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) brought some of the highest ratings to Discover Channel’s Shark Week 2014 and went viral on the Internet.  

But while the footage was unprecedented, the scientific understanding enabled by the REMUS SharkCam is just as groundbreaking.  The AUV was used during a science expedition in 2013 to better understand white shark behavior and represents the first successful efforts to autonomously track and image any animal in the marine environment. The research provides critical data to efforts to conserve these animals.

“We wanted to test the REMUS SharkCam technology to prove that is was a viable tool for observing marine animals – sharks in this case – and to collect substantial data about the animals’s behavior and habitat,” said WHOI engineer Amy Kukulya, one of REMUS SharkCam’s principal investigators.

The research results were recently published in the Journal of Fish Biology.  The paper’s lead author is Greg Skomal, a biologist with the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries. In addition to Kukulya, co-authors include biologist E. M. Hoyos-Padilla of Pelagios-Kakunjá, a Mexican marine conservation organization, and WHOI engineer and REMUS SharkCam software developer Roger Stokey.  

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Deep Partner

Deep Partner

The submersibles DeepRover2 (pictured) and Nadir survey a field of soft corals and sponges at about 80 meters depth off…

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Coral Hideaway

Coral Hideaway

WHOI geologist Konrad Hughen took this photo during a 2015 expedition to conduct coral reef surveys and obtain coral core samples…

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