Ocean Life


New 13-year Study Tracks Impact of Changing Climate on a Key Marine Food Source

New 13-year Study Tracks Impact of Changing Climate on a Key Marine Food Source

A new multiyear study from scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has shown for the first time how changes in ocean temperature affect a key species of phytoplankton. The study, published in the October 21 issue of the journal Science, tracked levels of Synechococcus – ”a tiny bacterium common in marine ecosystems – ”near the coast of Massachusetts over a 13-year period. As ocean temperatures increased during that time, annual blooms of Synechococcus occurred up to four weeks earlier than usual because cells divided faster in warmer conditions, the study found.

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Are Reefs Resilient?

Are Reefs Resilient?

Hannah Barkley, a recent graduate of the MIT-WHOI Joint Program, presents her thesis research on coral reef health in the…

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Study Reveals Corals’ Influence on Reef Microbes

Study Reveals Corals' Influence on Reef Microbes

As they grow, corals are bathed in a sea of marine microbes, such as bacteria, algae, and viruses. While these extremely abundant and tiny microorganisms influence coral communities in a variety of ways, a new study by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) and University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) reveals that corals also have an impact on the microbes in waters surrounding them

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Dressed for the Deep

Dressed for the Deep

WHOI engineer Molly Curran puts the finishing touches on the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Sentry by re-attaching its freshly-cleaned, bright…

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A Slithery Ocean Mystery

A Slithery Ocean Mystery

It’s an enduring mystery: How do tiny eel larvae make their way from the Sargasso Sea to coastal freshwater estuaries where they grow up?

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Keeping It Clean

Keeping It Clean

Bowdoin College Summer Student Fellow Ben Geyman (left) checks samples with WHOI marine biogeochemist Tristan Horner and WHOI researcher Maureen…

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Science Is His Beat

Science Is His Beat

Ari Daniel earned a Ph.D.in biology, studying orcas in the MIT-WHOI Joint Program. But he has made a career as…

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