Coral


Macroscopic Life

They look like space stations, but actually are colonial forms of single-celled organisms called radiolarians, collected in the deep Celebes…

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Virgin Island Corals in Crisis

A coral disease outbreak that wiped out nearly 80% of stony corals between Florida’s Key Biscayne and Key West during the past two years appears to have spread to the U.S. Virgin Islands (U.S.V.I.), where reefs that were once vibrant and teeming with life are now left skeleton white in the disease’s wake.

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New Deep-Sea Coral Species Discovered

The New York Times

New ‘bubblegum’ corals found in Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Monument during human-occupied submersible dives.

Coral

Many people think of coral as hard, rock-like formations that attract abundant, diverse marine life. In fact, corals are themselves…

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Deep-sea Corals

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When most people think of corals, they think od the big interconnected structures such as the Great Barrier Reef off Australia. But deep in the ocean much smaller coral formations lie past the point where light penetrates.

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A DISCO in the Ocean

A DISCO in the Ocean

To investigate coral bleaching, WHOI scientists figure out a novel way to take direct measurements in the ocean of superoxide, a key molecule that vanishes almost as soon as it is made.

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Coral Larvae Use Sound to Find a Home on the Reef

Coral Larvae Use Sound to Find a Home on the Reef

Choosing a place to call home is one of the most consequential choices a coral can make. In the animal’s larval stage, it floats freely in the ocean, but once it settles down, it anchors itself permanently to the rocky substrate of a reef, and remains stuck there for the rest of its life. Exactly how these larvae choose a specific place to live, however, is largely unclear.

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How Do Corals Build Their Skeletons?

How Do Corals Build Their Skeletons?

WHOI scientists discovered precisely how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons’ a factor that will help scientists predict how corals throughout the world will fare as the oceans become more acidic.

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Study Tracks Severe Bleaching Events on a Pacific Coral Reef Over Past Century

Study Tracks Severe Bleaching Events on a Pacific Coral Reef Over Past Century

As climate change causes ocean temperatures to rise, coral reefs worldwide are experiencing mass bleaching events and die-offs. For many, this is their first encounter with extreme heat. However for some reefs in the central Pacific, heatwaves caused by El Nino are a way of life. Exactly how these reefs deal with repeated episodes of extreme heat has been unclear. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), has uncovered the history of bleaching on a reef in the epicenter of El Nino, revealing how some corals have been able to return after facing extreme conditions. The study was published October 26, 2018, in the journal Communications Biology.

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First Time Out

First Time Out

Postdoctoral investigator Eyal Wurgaft, research assistant Kate Morkeski, and MIT-WHOI Joint Program graduate student Mallory Ringham (left to right) lower…

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Sounds of the Reef

Sounds of the Reef

Engineer Rod Catanach sets up a four-channel acoustic recorder to measure coral reef soundscapes—a combination of biological and non-biological sounds…

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Bleached Corals

Bleached Corals

Hanny Rivera, a graduate student in the MIT-WHOI Joint Program, takes a tissue sample from a bleached coral. When ocean…

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Searching for ‘Super Reefs’

Searching for ‘Super Reefs’

Some corals are less vulnerable to ocean acidification. Can the offspring from these more resilient corals travel to other reefs to help sustain more vulnerable coral populations there?

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Looking for Resilience

Looking for Resilience

WHOI coral scientists Anne Cohen and Pat Lohmann extract core samples from a coral during a recent cruise to Kiritimati…

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The Unseen World on Coral Reefs

The Unseen World on Coral Reefs

We have learned that microbial communities on and within us—a microbiome—keep people healthy. Corals reefs also have their own microbiomes that they couldn’t function without.

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Canyon Explorers

Canyon Explorers

Yesterday, on the second anniversary of the founding of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Monument, WHOI deep-sea biologist Tim…

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Welcome, Alucia

Welcome, Alucia

The research vessel Alucia arrived in Woods Hole, Mass., for the first time on Saturday, August 25. The ship was…

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