Tsunamis


Tsunamis

Even Hollywood-scale waves fall short when depicting a tsunami’s full size and power.

Read More

A New Tsunami-Warning System

A New Tsunami-Warning System

After successfully testing a long-range underwater communications system that worked under Arctic Ocean ice, an engineering team at Woods Hole…

Read More

Sizing Up the Tsunami Threat

Hakai Magazine

article features research on the R/V Neil Armstrong, and mentions Rob Evans, Dan Lizarralde, and TowCam 

Disaster on the Ground

Chen and Beardsley also used FVCOM to make finely detailed reconstructions of how the tsunami swept ashore in some locations.…

Read More

WHOI Receives $1Million from Keck Foundation for First Real-Time Seafloor Earthquake Observatory at Cascadia Fault

One of the most dangerous faults in North America is the Pacific Northwest’s Cascadia fault – an offshore, subduction zone fault capable of producing a magnitude 9 earthquake that would damage Portland, Tacoma, Seattle, and Victoria, British Columbia, and generate a large tsunami. Yet there are currently no instruments installed offshore, directly above the fault, for measuring the strain that is currently building up along the fault.
But a recent $1 million grant from The W. M. Keck Foundation to scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will change that. An interdisciplinary project led by WHOI geologist Jeff McGuire, an expert in global earthquake seismology and geodesy, and John Collins, director of WHOI’s Ocean Bottom Seismometer Lab, will build and install the first seafloor geodesy observatory above the expected rupture zone of the next great Cascadia earthquake.

Read More

Reconstructing a Tsunami

This simulation, produced by ocean modelers Changsheng Chen and Robert Beardsley using the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM), shows…

Read More

How to Survive a Tsunami

How to Survive a Tsunami

In the aftermath of the 2004 tsunami in the Indian Ocean that devastated villages and cost 230,000 lives, WHOI geophysicist…

Read More

Anatomy of a Tsunami

While tsunamis can neither be prevented nor precisely predicted, people educated about particular warning signs can save their own lives…

Read More

Building a Tsunami Warning Network

Building a Tsunami Warning Network

Since the great Indonesian earthquake and tsunami of December 26, 2004, policy-makers and scientists around the globe have been embracing a rare moment of public attention on the oceans, accelerating plans to create a comprehensive tsunami-warning network and to make citizens better prepared for the next massive wave. Another potent earthquake along the same fault on March 28, 2005, has increased that sense of urgency.

Read More

Tsunamis in the Caribbean? It’s Possible.

Tsunamis in the Caribbean? It's Possible.

In a study published Dec. 24, 2004, in the Journal of Geophysical Research, Woods Hole geologists Uri ten Brink and Jian Lin reported a heightened earthquake risk from the Septentrional fault zone, which cuts through the highly populated Cibao valley in the Dominican Republic.

Read More

Undersea Cracks along Continental Shelf Could Trigger Tsunamis along U.S. East Coast

Potential landslides on the outer continental shelf and slope along the Mid-Atlantic coast could trigger tsunamis that might have devastating effects on populated coastal areas. In a paper published in the May 2000 issue of the journal Geology,Neal Driscoll of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and colleagues Jeffrey Weissel of Columbia University??A?s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and John Goff of the University of Texas at Austin say newly discovered cracks along the edge of the continental shelf could be an early warning sign that the seafloor is unstable in these areas.

Read More