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Earthquakes


Rapid Response

Rapid Response

The earthquakes were coming fast and frequent, as many as 50 to 70 an hour. On the morning of Sunday, Feb. 28, undersea hydrophones began detecting the most intense swarm of earthquakes to occur in the last three years along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, about 200 miles off the Pacific Northwest coast.

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Deep-Sea Tremors May Provide Early Warning System for Larger Earthquakes

Predicting when large earthquakes might occur may be a step closer to reality, thanks to a new study of undersea earthquakes in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The study, reported in today??A’s Nature, is the first to suggest that small seismic shocks or foreshocks preceding a major earthquake can be used in some cases to predict the main tremors.

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Transmitting Sound Energy

The SOFAR channel efficiently transmits sound energy in the ocean. By Deborah K. Smith :: Originally published online August 3,…

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Ears in the Ocean

Ears in the Ocean

If you sought to delve into the forces that drive and shape the face of the earth and that distinguish it from all other planets in our solar system, you would shine a spotlight on the mid-ocean ridges.

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Earthshaking Events

Earthshaking Events

When I was still a schoolboy in China, two major earthquakes occurred, about a year apart. They had a profound…

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Peering into the Crystal Fabric of Rocks

Peering into the Crystal Fabric of Rocks

“Rock solid” is an oxymoron, to my way of thinking. Oh, the expression does have some truth in that minuscule, superficial portion of our planet where humans dwell. But the majority of rocks nearly everywhere else in the earth are continually changing their physical characteristics.

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Listening Closely to ‘See’ Into the Earth

Listening Closely to 'See' Into the Earth

Today, excitement and anticipation is growing because of new generations of seismographs designed for use in the oceans. These new instruments will comprise a new national pool of instruments for use by the scientific community.

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Ocean Seismic Network Seafloor Observatories

Ocean Seismic Network Seafloor Observatories

Our knowledge of the physical characteristics of Earth’s deep interior is based largely on observations of surface vibrations that occur after large earthquakes. Using the same techniques as CAT (Computer Aided Tomography) scans in medical imaging, seismologists can “image” the interior of our planet. But just as medical imaging requires sensors that surround the patient, seismic imaging requires sensors surrounding the earth.

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